Meaning of PHOTOCOMPOSITION in English

PHOTOCOMPOSITION

also called Phototypesetting, or Filmsetting, method of assembling or setting type by photographing characters on film from which printing plates are made. The characters are developed as photographic positives on film or light-sensitive paper from a negative master containing all the characters; the film, carrying the completed text, is then used for making a plate for letterpress, gravure, or lithographic printing by a photomechanical process. Some photocomposing machines automatically select and position the negative of the desired characters in rapid succession so that their images are projected on a roll of film, which is exposed at high speed. Varying the projection scale produces different type sizes. In other machines the characters are generated by computer and electronically created on the film. A typewriter-like keyboard controls the operation in either case. Typesetting by photography was proposed as early as 1866. The Hungarian engineer Eugene Porzolt designed the first photocomposing machine in 1894, but machines such as the Fotosetter did not become available commercially until the 1950s. By the 1960s, such machines were being combined with digital computers, which prepared tapes and controlled machines in high-speed operations. Present-day photocomposition machines use computers to make end-of-line (hyphenation and justification) and page design decisions automatically, thereby producing copy faster and cheaper than units that require operators to make end-of-line decisions. See also computerized typesetting.

Britannica English vocabulary.      Английский словарь Британика.