Meaning of COOL in English

COOL

I. cool 1 S2 W3 /kuːl/ BrE AmE adjective ( comparative cooler , superlative coolest )

[ Word Family: noun : ↑ cool , ↑ coolness , ↑ cooler , ↑ coolant ; verb : ↑ cool ; adverb : ↑ coolly ; adjective : ↑ cool ]

[ Language: Old English ; Origin: col ]

1 . TEMPERATURE low in temperature, but not cold, often in a way that feels pleasant:

She swam out into the cool water.

The evening air was cool.

Relax in the sun with a cool drink.

the cooler weather of September

2 . CLOTHING clothing that is cool is made of thin material so that you do not become too hot:

a cool cotton dress

3 . CALM calm and not nervous, upset, or excited

keep/stay cool

his ability to keep cool in a crisis

She looks efficient and as cool as a cucumber.

Outwardly she is cool, calm, and collected.

a cool customer (=someone who always behaves calmly)

Keep a cool head (=stay calm) .

4 . APPROVAL informal very attractive, fashionable, interesting etc in a way that people admire – used in order to show approval:

She’s pretty cool.

You look cool in denim.

Cool bike!

‘I’m thinking of studying abroad.’ ‘Really? Cool.’

5 . AGREEMENT spoken used to say that you agree with something, that you understand it, or that it does not annoy you:

OK, Ryan, that’s cool, I can do it.

‘I just have to go, you know.’ ‘It’s all right, it’s cool.’

‘I’m finished.’ ‘Cool.’

cool about

My mum was cool about whatever I wore.

something is cool with somebody

Is Friday cool with you guys?

somebody is cool with something

‘Do you want to come over and watch a video tonight?’ ‘I’m cool with that.’

6 . NOT FRIENDLY behaving in a way that is not as friendly as you expect:

My proposal met with a cool response.

Luke gave her a cool look.

7 . COLOUR a cool colour is one, such as blue or green, that makes you think of cool things

8 . a cool million/hundred thousand etc informal a surprisingly large amount of money:

He earns a cool half million every year.

—coolness noun [uncountable] :

the coolness of the nights

—coolly adverb :

She nodded coolly and walked out.

II. cool 2 S2 BrE AmE verb

[ Word Family: noun : ↑ cool , ↑ coolness , ↑ cooler , ↑ coolant ; verb : ↑ cool ; adverb : ↑ coolly ; adjective : ↑ cool ]

1 . [intransitive and transitive] ( also cool down ) to make something slightly colder, or to become slightly colder:

The air conditioning doesn’t seem to be cooling the room much.

Allow the biscuits to cool for five minutes.

a cooling breeze

2 . [intransitive] if a feeling, emotion, or relationship cools, it becomes less strong:

The affair had cooled, on her side at least.

When tempers had cooled, he apologized.

3 . cool it spoken

a) used to tell someone to stop being angry, violent etc:

Come on now – calm down, cool it.

b) to stop putting as much effort into something, or pressure on someone, as you have been:

He was getting more serious about her. It was time to cool it.

4 . cool your heels to be forced to wait:

I’ll put him in a cell to cool his heels for a bit.

cool down phrasal verb

1 . to make something slightly colder, or to become slightly colder:

The air has cooled down a little now.

cool somebody/something ↔ down

A cold beer will cool you down.

2 . to become calm after being angry:

After I cooled down I realized I had been wrong.

cool off phrasal verb

1 . to return to a normal temperature after being hot:

Cool off with an iced drink.

By late autumn Mediterranean islands have cooled off, and can have rainy days.

2 . to become calm after being angry SYN calm down :

He slammed the door and went for a walk to cool off.

III. cool 3 BrE AmE noun

[ Word Family: noun : ↑ cool , ↑ coolness , ↑ cooler , ↑ coolant ; verb : ↑ cool ; adverb : ↑ coolly ; adjective : ↑ cool ]

1 . the cool a temperature that is pleasantly cold

the cool of

They went for a stroll in the cool of the evening.

2 . keep your cool to remain calm in a frightening or difficult situation:

I must keep my cool, she thought; losing my temper isn’t going to help.

3 . lose your cool to stop being calm in an annoying or frightening situation:

Kenneth finally lost his cool with a photographer, and threatened to hit him.

IV. cool 4 BrE AmE adverb

play it cool to behave in a calm way because you do not want someone to know that you are really nervous, angry etc:

She would not show him how upset she was. It was always smarter to play it cool.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English.      Longman - Словарь современного английского языка.