Meaning of SMOOTH in English

SMOOTH

/ smuːð; NAmE / adjective , verb

■ adjective

( smooth·er , smooth·est )

FLAT / EVEN

1.

completely flat and even, without any lumps, holes or rough areas :

a lotion to make your skin feel soft and smooth

The water was as smooth as glass.

a paint that gives a smooth, silky finish

Over the years, the stone steps had worn smooth.

OPP rough

WITHOUT LUMPS

2.

( of a liquid mixture ) without any lumps :

Mix the flour with the milk to form a smooth paste.

WITHOUT PROBLEMS

3.

happening or continuing without any problems :

They are introducing new measures to ensure the smooth running of the business.

They could not ensure a smooth transfer of political power.

MOVEMENT

4.

even and regular, without sudden stops and starts :

The car's improved suspension gives you a smoother ride.

The plane made a smooth landing.

She swung herself over the gate in one smooth movement.

MAN

5.

(often disapproving ) ( of people, especially men, and their behaviour ) very polite and pleasant, but in a way that is often not very sincere

SYN smarmy :

I don't like him. He's far too smooth for me.

He's something of a smooth operator .

DRINK / TASTE

6.

pleasant and not bitter :

This coffee has a smooth, rich taste.

VOICE / MUSIC

7.

nice to hear, and without any rough or unpleasant sounds

►  smooth·ness noun [ U ]:

the smoothness of her skin

They admired the smoothness and efficiency with which the business was run.

IDIOMS

see rough noun

■ verb

1.

~ sth (back / down / out) to make sth smooth :

[ vn ]

He smoothed his hair back.

She was smoothing out the creases in her skirt.

[ vn - adj ]

He took the letter and smoothed it flat on the table.

2.

~ sth on / into / over sth to put a layer of a soft substance over a surface :

Smooth the icing over the top of the cake.

IDIOMS

- smooth the path / way

- smooth (sb's) ruffled feathers

PHRASAL VERBS

- smooth sth away / out

- smooth sth over

••

WORD ORIGIN

Old English smōth , probably of Germanic origin, though no cognates are known. The verb dates from Middle English .

Oxford Advanced Learner's English Dictionary.      Оксфордский английский словарь для изучающик язык на продвинутом уровне.