Meaning of ARROW in English

ARROW

I. ˈa(ˌ)rō, ˈarə also ˈe-; often -_rəw +V noun

( -s )

Usage: often attributive

Etymology: Middle English arewe, arwe, from Old English arwe, earh; akin to Old Norse ör arrow, Gothic arhwazna, Latin arcus bow, arc

1. : a missile weapon shot from a bow and usually consisting of a straight slender shaft that has a point or sharp head of stone or metal, feathers or vanes fastened near the butt, and a nock to be fitted to a bowstring

2. : something felt to resemble an arrow especially in shape: as

a. : a mark (as on a map or signboard) to indicate direction

b. : the inflorescence of the sugarcane or the shoot that develops into the inflorescence

c. : a surveyor's marking pin used to mark the ground at each chain's length — called also chain pin

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II. intransitive verb

( -ed/-ing/-s )

1. : to move fast and straight like an arrow in flight : dart

the wild geese could not arrow through the storm — S.V.Benét

2. of sugarcane : to develop arrows : flower

III. ˈarə adjective

Etymology: by folk etymology from e'er a

dialect England : ever a

Webster's New International English Dictionary.      Новый международный словарь английского языка Webster.