Meaning of LACQUER in English

LACQUER

I. noun

also lack·er ˈlakə(r)

( -s )

Etymology: lacquer, alteration (probably influenced by French laque lac) of earlier lacker, from obsolete leckar, laker, lacre lac, from Old Portuguese lacra, lacre, lácar, variants of laca, from Arabic lakk — more at lacca

1.

a. : a spirit varnish (as shellac) often colored and used especially for coating brass and other metals to heighten their luster or prevent tarnishing

b. : any of various tough durable natural varnishes ; especially : a varnish obtained by tapping the Japanese varnish tree — called also Chinese lacquer, Japanese lacquer ; compare burmese lacquer

c. : any of various clear or colored synthetic liquid organic coatings that typically dry to form a film by evaporation of a volatile constituent and are used for many industrial purposes ; especially : a coating in which a cellulose derivative (as cellulose nitrate) serves to form such a film with or without a natural or synthetic resin (as an alkyd)

automotive lacquers are sprayed on

— compare enamel 3, varnish 1a

d. : a highly glazed finish for fabrics usually applied in patterns on a plain ground

e. : a resinous coating applied to flat sheet metal or formed metal cans and usually dried by baking

2. or lacquer ware : a decorative article made of wood coated with Japanese or other Oriental lacquer and often inlaid with ivory or metal ; collectively : such articles or ware

3. or lacquer red : a variable color averaging a dark reddish orange that is redder, stronger, and slightly lighter than ocher red and redder, stronger, and slightly lighter than burnt sienna

4.

a. : a dressing (as an alcoholic solution of a gum or resin) for the hair usually applied by spraying and intended to keep the hair smooth and in place

b. : nail polish

II. transitive verb

also lacker “

( -ed/-ing/-s )

1. : to coat with lacquer : varnish

2. : to give a smooth finish or appearance to : to make glossy : polish

wound up with a virtuosity that lacquered over any rough patches that had been laid bare in the White Paper — B.A.Young

does not … lacquer the phrase as did some of the accusers — Jerome Mellquist

Webster's New International English Dictionary.      Новый международный словарь английского языка Webster.