Meaning of O'NEILL, JAMES in English

O'NEILL, JAMES

born Nov. 15, 1849, Kilkenny, County Kilkenny, Ire. died Aug. 10, 1920, New London, Conn., U.S. Irish-born American actor, now chiefly remembered for his most famous role, the Count of Monte Cristo, and as the father of playwright Eugene O'Neill. James O'Neill made his stage debut as a supernumerary in a Cincinnati, Ohio, production of The Colleen Bawn (1867). In 1871 he moved to Chicago, playing leading roles in McVicker's company and then in Hooley's opposite many of the day's great stars. He later performed with stock companies in New York City and San Francisco, and he was considered one of the most promising young actors of his time. In 1879 he was selected to play Christ in a San Francisco production of The Passion Play by Salmi Morse. The role, which caused local authorities to arrest him under ordinances forbidding impersonation of the Deity, drew nationwide attention. In 1882 O'Neill opened as Edmond Dantes in The Count of Monte Cristo in a stage version by Charles Fechter (1882). His opening-night performance was ill-received by the press, but public enthusiasm was immediate, and the role eventually earned for O'Neill nearly $1,000,000 for more than 6,000 performances throughout the United States over a 30-year period. Dantes was not O'Neill's sole success, however; he was well received in a variety of Shakespearean roles, including that of Hamlet. He played Othello to Edwin Booth's Iago and MacDuff to Booth's Macbeth. O'Neill also excelled as Pierre Frochard in The Two Orphans, D'Artagnan in The Three Musketeers, and Jean Renard in A Celebrated Case. In his later career O'Neill attempted other roles, both modern and classical, but his public preferred to see him in The Count of Monte Cristo. An acerbic portrait of O'Neill in decline is presented in his son's semiautobiographical play Long Day's Journey into Night in the character of James Tyrone.

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