Meaning of TIMPANI in English

TIMPANI

Timpani, or kettledrum, and drumsticks. Click on the audio icon beneath the art to hear the also spelled tympani (Italian: drums), orchestral kettledrums. The name has been applied to large kettledrums since at least the 17th century. The permanent orchestral use of timpani dates from the mid-17th century, early examples being in Matthew Locke's Psyche (1673) and Jean-Baptiste Lully's opera Thse (1675). At first they were mainly confined to expressions of rejoicing or to supporting the brass in loud passages. Two instruments, one tuned to the tonic and the other to the dominant (first and fifth notes of the scale), were normal in 17th- and 18th-century scores. Later, more instruments were used with a variety of tunings. In the 19th century the timpani were used in more varied and expressive ways, a development stimulated in large part by the innovations of Ludwig van Beethoven. The French composer Hector Berlioz, who required 16 kettledrums in his Grand Messe des morts (1837; Requiem), even urged composers to specify which type of hard or soft sticks they wished used. In modern timpani the bowl-shaped shell is usually of copper or brass. The membrane, of calfskin or synthetic material, is secured by a metal hoop. Its tension is varied by hand screws fixed to the shell and acting on the hoop, or, more often, by one of several 19th- and 20th-century devices: pedal or hand mechanisms that control the tension by rods connected to the hoop. A hole is pierced at the bottom of the shell to avoid air concussion splitting the head in loud passages. The tone varies according to the texture of the head of the stick and the area of the membrane struck. Occasionally, composers specify using the fingers to set the membrane in vibration. The orchestral kettledrum has a practical compass of five full tones. The compass of a pair of timpani is normally an octave from F below middle C downward; for an orchestral set of three, the tuning ranges are generally cg, Gd, and EB (g = the G below middle C; E = the second E below). Such composers as Igor Stravinsky and Gustav Mahler have extended this range. The expressive resources of the timpani include reiteration of persistent rhythms, dramatic crescendos, sudden stresses, and atmospheric rolls. Special effects include damped or muffled notes, striking a note with two sticks, pedal glissando (sliding pitch) on a roll, and muting by placing a cloth on the drumhead.

Britannica English vocabulary.      Английский словарь Британика.