Meaning of ARMISTICE in English

ARMISTICE

ar ‧ mi ‧ stice /ˈɑːməstəs, ˈɑːmɪstəs $ ˈɑːrm-/ BrE AmE noun [countable]

[ Date: 1700-1800 ; Language: French ; Origin: Modern Latin armistitium , from Latin arma ( ⇨ ↑ arm 1 ) + -stitium (as in solstitium ; , ↑ solstice ) ]

an agreement to stop fighting ⇨ ceasefire , truce

• • •

THESAURUS

▪ peace a situation in which there is no war or fighting:

There has been peace in the region for six years now.

▪ truce an agreement to stop fighting or arguing with each other for a limited period of time:

The rebels have ended a 17-month-old truce.

|

He called for a truce between Israeli and Palestinian forces.

|

There was an uneasy truce between Lily and Stephen at dinner.

▪ ceasefire an agreement to stop fighting for a limited period of time, especially in order to discuss making peace:

The two sides agreed to a ceasefire which would come into force immediately.

▪ armistice a formal agreement to stop fighting a war and to discuss making peace:

The Korean armistice was signed in July 1953.

▪ calm a situation in which there is no violence, argument, or protest:

Attempts by the police to restore calm in the area failed.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English.      Longman - Словарь современного английского языка.