Meaning of BEAT in English

BEAT

/ biːt; NAmE / verb , noun , adjective

■ verb

( beat , beaten / ˈbiːtn; NAmE /)

IN GAME

1.

[ vn ] beat sb (at sth) to defeat sb in a game or competition :

He beat me at chess.

Their recent wins have proved they're still the ones to beat (= the most difficult team to beat) .

CONTROL

2.

[ vn ] to get control of sth

SYN defeat :

The government's main aim is to beat inflation.

BE TOO DIFFICULT

3.

to be too difficult for sb

SYN defeat :

[ vn ]

a problem that beats even the experts

[ vn wh- ]

It beats me (= I don't know) why he did it.

What beats me is how it was done so quickly (= I don't understand how) .

BE BETTER

4.

[ vn ] to do or be better than sth :

Nothing beats home cooking.

You can't beat Italian shoes.

They want to beat the speed record (= go faster than anyone before) .

AVOID

5.

[ vn ] to avoid sth :

If we go early we should beat the traffic.

We were up and off early to beat the heat .

HIT

6.

to hit sb/sth many times, usually very hard :

[ v + adv. / prep. ]

Somebody was beating at the door.

Hailstones beat against the window.

[ vn , often + adv. / prep. ]

Someone was beating a drum.

She was beating dust out of the carpet (= removing dust from the carpet by beating it) .

An elderly man was found beaten to death .

At that time children were regularly beaten for quite minor offences (= a punishment) .

[ vn - adj ]

They beat him unconscious (= hit him until he became unconscious) .

OF HEART / DRUMS / WINGS

7.

to make, or cause sth to make, a regular sound or movement :

[ v ]

She's alive—her heart is still beating .

We heard the drums beating .

[ vn ]

The bird was beating its wings (= moving them up and down) frantically.

MIX

8.

[ vn ] beat sth (up) | beat A and B together to mix sth with short quick movements with a fork, etc. :

Beat the eggs up to a frothy consistency.

Beat the flour and milk together.

SHAPE METAL

9.

beat sth (out) (into sth) to change the shape of sth, especially metal, by hitting it with a hammer, etc. :

[ vn ]

beaten silver

The gold is beaten out into thin strips.

[ vn - adj ]

The metal had been beaten flat.

MAKE PATH

10.

[ vn ] beat sth (through, across, along, etc. sth) to make a path, etc. by walking somewhere or by pressing branches down and walking over them :

a well-beaten track (= one that has been worn hard by much use)

The hunters beat a path through the undergrowth.

IDIOMS

- beat about the bush

- beat sb at their own game

- beat your brains out

- beat your breast

- beat the clock

- beat it

- beat a path to sb's door

- beat the rap

- beat a (hasty) retreat

- beat time (to sth)

- beat sb to the punch

- can you beat that / it!

- if you can't beat them, join them

- off the beaten track

- a rod / stick to beat sb with

- take some beating

—more at black adjective , daylights , drum noun , hell

PHRASAL VERBS

- beat sth down

- beat down (on sb/sth)

- beat sb/sth down (to sth)

- beat off

- beat sb/sth off

- beat sth out

- beat sb out of sth

- beat sb to sth / ... | beat sb to it

- beat sb up

- beat up on sb

- beat yourself up (about / over sth)

■ noun

OF DRUMS / HEART / WINGS

1.

[ C ] a single blow to sth, such as a drum, or a movement of sth, such as your heart; the sound that this makes :

several loud beats on the drum

His heart missed a beat when he saw her.

2.

[ sing. ] a series of regular blows to sth, such as a drum; the sound that this makes :

the steady beat of the drums

—see also heartbeat

RHYTHM

3.

[ C ] the main rhythm, or a unit of rhythm, in a piece of music, a poem, etc. :

This type of music has a strong beat to it.

The piece has four beats to the bar.

OF POLICE OFFICER

4.

[ C ] the area which a police officer walks around regularly and which he or she is responsible for :

More police officers out on the beat may help to cut crime.

IDIOMS

see heart , walk verb

■ adjective

[ not before noun ] ( informal ) = dead beat

••

SYNONYMS

beat

batter ♦ pound ♦ pummel ♦ lash ♦ hammer

All these words mean to hit sb/sth many times, especially hard.

beat

to hit sb/sth a lot of times, especially very hard:

Someone was beating at the door.

A young man was found beaten to death last night.

At that time, children were often beaten for quite minor offences (= as a punishment) .

batter

to hit sb/sth hard a lot of times, especially in way that causes serious damage:

He had been badly battered around the head and face.

Severe winds have been battering the coast.

pound

to hit sb/sth hard a lot of times, especially in a way that makes a lot of noise:

Heavy rain pounded on the roof.

pummel

to hit sb/sth a lot of times, especially with your fists (= tightly closed hands) .

lash

to hit sb/sth with a lot of force:

The rain lashed at the window.

NOTE

The subject of lash is often rain, wind, hail, sea or waves .

hammer

to hit sb/sth hard a lot of times, in a way that is noisy or violent:

He hammered the door with his fists.

pound or hammer?

There is not much difference in meaning between these two, but to pound is sometimes a steadier action. To hammer can be more violent and it is often used figuratively.

PATTERNS AND COLLOCATIONS :

to beat / batter / pound / pummel / lash / hammer sb/sth with sth

to beat / batter / pound / lash / hammer against sth

to beat / batter / pound / hammer on sth

to beat / batter / hammer sth down

to beat / batter sb about / around the head

the rain / wind / hail / sea beats / batters / pounds / lashes (at) sth

••

WORD ORIGIN

Old English bēatan , of Germanic origin.

Oxford Advanced Learner's English Dictionary.      Оксфордский английский словарь для изучающик язык на продвинутом уровне.