Meaning of BORROW in English

BORROW

INDEX:

1. to borrow something

2. to borrow money

3. to pay money so that you can borrow and use something

4. money that is borrowed

RELATED WORDS

opposite

↑ LEND

to owe money to someone because you have borrowed from them : ↑ OWE

◆◆◆

1. to borrow something

▷ borrow /ˈbɒrəʊǁˈbɑː-, ˈbɔː-/ [transitive verb]

if you borrow something from someone, they let you have it, and you agree to give it back to them later :

▪ Can I borrow your pen for a second?

▪ I wish Steve would buy himself a bike. He’s always borrowing mine.

borrow something from/off somebody

▪ She found the poem in a book she’d borrowed off Mrs Parsons.

▪ I borrowed this dress from my sister.

borrowed [adjective]

▪ After I graduated from college, I moved into a borrowed apartment in Brooklyn Heights.

▷ have the use of also have the loan of /ˌhæv ðə juːs ɒv, ˌhæv ðə ˈləʊn ɒv/ [verb phrase] British

to have someone’s permission to borrow something, especially something large or expensive such as a car or boat for a particular length of time :

▪ Could we have the loan of your video camera this weekend?

let somebody have the use of something

▪ Dad usually lets me have the use of his car when he’s away on business.

▷ be on loan /biː ɒn ˈləʊn/ [verb phrase]

if something is on loan from a library, art collection etc, it has been borrowed from it :

▪ These pictures are on loan from the Paul Getty Collection.

be out on loan

not be available because it has been borrowed

▪ The librarian phoned to say the book you want is out on loan until next week.

2. to borrow money

▷ borrow /ˈbɒrəʊǁˈbɑː-, ˈbɔː-/ [intransitive/transitive verb]

if you borrow money from someone, they give it to you, and you agree to pay it back later :

▪ Companies normally expect to borrow at cheaper rates than ordinary people have to pay.

borrow something from/off somebody

▪ Can I borrow five pounds off you till next week?

▪ By the end of the war the Canadian government had borrowed over $5 billion from its own citizens.

borrow heavily

borrow a lot of money

▪ Maxwell had borrowed heavily to finance his business projects.

borrowed [adjective]

▪ The takeover bid was financed mainly with borrowed cash.

borrower [countable noun]

▪ The fall in interest rates is bad news for savers but good news for borrowers.

▷ take out a loan /ˌteɪk aʊt ə ˈləʊn/ [verb phrase]

to borrow a large amount of money from a bank or company :

▪ Three years ago, we took out a loan to buy our car and we’re still paying it off.

take out a loan from

▪ If you take out a loan from the company you have to pay it back within two years.

3. to pay money so that you can borrow and use something

▷ rent /rent/ [intransitive/transitive verb]

to pay a particular amount of money regularly for the use of a house, office, telephone etc over a period of months or years :

▪ Many young couples rent an apartment until they’ve saved enough money to buy a house.

▪ I can’t afford to rent an office in this part of town.

▪ Do you own your home or are you renting?

rent something from somebody/something

▪ Did you know you can rent a fax machine from the telephone company?

for rent

available to be rented

▪ Vicky put the house up for rent a month ago, but changed her mind the next day.

rented [adjective]

▪ We’ve lived in rented accommodation since we were married so we’re desperate to get our own place.

▷ rent especially American hire British /rent, haɪəʳ/ [transitive verb]

to pay money to a company to use a car, or a piece of equipment or clothing for a period of days or hours :

▪ Should we rent a video tonight?

▪ Let’s hire a car for the weekend and go and visit Jenny and Steve.

▪ You rented a tuxedo for two hundred dollars? Are you crazy?

hire/rent something from somebody/something

▪ When she got to Dallas she rented a Ford convertible from the Avis desk.

rented also hired British [adjective]

▪ No, the skis aren’t mine. They’re hired.

▪ The bride arrived at the church in a rented limousine.

▷ lease /liːs/ [transitive verb]

to pay rent for the use of buildings, land, equipment, or a vehicle for a long time, especially for business purposes :

▪ The Cider Press Company leases the machinery and buildings for $1000 a month.

▪ It would work out cheaper overall to lease the computers for the project.

lease something from somebody/something

▪ The building is actually owned by the government -- we’re leasing it from them.

▷ charter /ˈtʃɑːʳtəʳ/ [transitive verb]

to pay money to a company for the use of one of their planes or ships :

▪ A group of journalists chartered an airplane to fly them to Addis Ababa.

▪ International Aid Agencies have chartered ships to transport supplies to the disaster area.

4. money that is borrowed

▷ loan /ləʊn/ [countable noun]

an amount of money that is borrowed, especially from a bank or company, which you agree to pay back by the end of a period of time :

▪ If you need more money, we can arrange a loan.

a £5000/$20,000 loan

▪ The organization asked for a $2 million loan to plant new trees in the rainforest.

take out a loan

get a loan

▪ We took out a loan to buy a new car.

pay off/repay a loan

finish paying back what you borrowed

▪ I can’t afford to buy a new sofa until I pay off this loan.

bank loan

money you borrow from a bank

▪ Cox specialized in assisting borrowers who didn’t qualify for bank loans.

▷ mortgage /ˈmɔːʳgɪdʒ/ [countable noun]

a large amount of money that is borrowed from a bank or company in order to buy a house :

▪ The bank says we have to buy a life insurance policy before we can get a mortgage.

mortgage on

▪ Nick told me the mortgage on his apartment is worth about $90,000.

take out a mortgage

arrange to get a mortgage

▪ Anyone taking out a mortgage should be aware that interest rates can go up at any time.

pay off a mortgage

pay all of it back

▪ It took my parents nearly thirty years to pay off their mortgage.

▷ interest /ˈɪntrɪst, ˈɪntrəst/ [uncountable noun]

money that you pay for borrowing money, especially that you pay every year or every month at a fixed rate :

▪ Credit companies charge huge amounts of interest.

interest on

▪ What’s the interest on the loan?

Longman Activator English vocab.      Английский словарь Longman активатор .