Meaning of LACK in English

LACK

I. lack 1 S3 W2 /læk/ BrE AmE noun [singular, uncountable]

when there is not enough of something, or none of it SYN shortage OPP surplus

lack of

new parents suffering from lack of sleep

Too many teachers are treated with a lack of respect.

comments based on a total lack of information

Does their apparent lack of progress mean they are not doing their job properly?

tours that are cancelled for lack of bookings

There was no lack of willing helpers.

health problems linked to poor diet and a relative lack of exercise

• • •

COLLOCATIONS

■ adjectives

▪ a complete/total lack of something

I was amazed by his almost total lack of interest in music.

▪ a relative/comparative lack of something

There is a relative lack of research into this medical condition.

▪ a distinct/marked/conspicuous lack of something (=very noticeable)

She looked at him with a marked lack of enthusiasm.

▪ an apparent lack of something (=one that seems to exist)

Adam's apparent lack of concern angered his brother.

■ phrases

▪ there is no lack of something (=there is plenty of it)

There is no lack of information on the subject.

II. lack 2 W3 BrE AmE verb

[ Date: 1200-1300 ; Language: Middle Dutch ; Origin: laken ]

1 . [transitive] to not have something that you need, or not have enough of it:

Alex’s real problem is that he lacks confidence.

► Do not use ‘in’ or ‘of’ after the verb lack : We lack ideas (NOT We lack in/of ideas). However, you can use these prepositions after be lacking in and a lack : We are lacking in ideas. | There is a lack of ideas.

2 . not lack for something formal to have a lot of something:

He does not lack for critics.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English.      Longman - Словарь современного английского языка.