Meaning of CROSS in English

CROSS

/ krɒs; NAmE krɔːs/ noun , verb , adjective

■ noun

MARK ON PAPER

1.

[ C ] a mark or an object formed by two lines crossing each other (X or +); the mark (X) is often used on paper to show sth :

I've put a cross on the map to show where the hotel is.

Put a tick if the answer is correct and a cross if it's wrong.

Sign your name on the form where I've put a cross.

Those who could not write signed with a cross.

—see also noughts and crosses

—compare tick

FOR PUNISHMENT

2.

[ C ] a long vertical piece of wood with a shorter piece across it near the top. In the past people were hung on crosses and left to die as a punishment.

CHRISTIAN SYMBOL

3.

the Cross [ sing. ] the cross that Jesus Christ died on, used as a symbol of Christianity

4.

[ C ] an object, a design, a piece of jewellery, etc. in the shape of a cross, used as a symbol of Christianity :

She wore a small gold cross on a chain around her neck.

MEDAL

5.

(usually Cross ) [ C ] a small decoration in the shape of a cross that is given to sb as an honour for doing sth very brave

MIXTURE

6.

[ C , usually sing. ] cross (between A and B) a mixture of two different things, breeds of animal, etc. :

The play was a cross between a farce and a tragedy.

A mule is a cross between a horse and a donkey.

—see also hybrid

IN SPORT

7.

[ C ] ( in football ( soccer ) or hockey ) a kick or hit of the ball across the field rather than up or down it

—see also the Red Cross

IDIOMS

- have a (heavy) cross to bear

■ verb

GO / PUT ACROSS

1.

cross (over) (from ... ) (to / into ... ) | cross (over) (sth) to go across; to pass or stretch from one side to the other :

[ v ]

I waved and she crossed over (= crossed the road towards me) .

We crossed from Dover to Calais.

[ vn ]

to cross a / the road

to cross the sea / mountains

He crossed over the road and joined me.

to cross France by train

The bridge crosses the River Dee.

A look of annoyance crossed her face .

They crossed the finishing line together (= in a race) .

2.

[ v ] to pass across each other :

The roads cross just outside the town.

The straps cross over at the back and are tied at the waist.

Our letters must have crossed in the mail (= each was sent before the other was received) .

We seem to have a crossed line (= a telephone call that interrupts another call because of a wrong connection) .

3.

[ vn ] to put or place sth across or over sth else :

to cross your arms / legs (= place one arm or leg over the other)

She sat with her legs crossed.

a flag with a design of two crossed keys

OPPOSE

4.

[ vn ] to oppose sb or speak against them or their plans or wishes :

She's really nice until you cross her.

( literary )

He had been crossed in love (= the person he loved was not faithful to him) .

MIX ANIMALS / PLANTS

5.

[ vn ] cross A with B | cross A and B to make two different types of animal breed together; to mix two types of plant to form a new one :

A mule is the product of a horse crossed with a donkey.

( figurative )

He behaved like an army officer crossed with a professor.

IN SPORT

6.

[ v ] ( in football ( soccer ), etc. ) to kick or pass a ball sideways across the field

DRAW LINE

7.

[ vn ] to draw a line across sth :

to cross your t's (= the letters in writing)

( BrE )

to cross a cheque (= to draw two lines across it so that it can only be paid through a bank account)

MAKE CHRISTIAN SYMBOL

8.

[ vn ] cross yourself to make the sign of the cross (= the Christian symbol) on your chest

IDIOMS

- cross that bridge when you come to it

- cross your fingers

- cross my heart (and hope to die)

- cross your mind

- cross sb's palm with silver

- cross sb's path | people's paths cross

- cross swords (with sb)

—more at dot verb , wire noun

PHRASAL VERBS

- cross sb/sth off | cross sb/sth off sth

- cross sth out / through

- cross over (to / into sth)

■ adjective

( cross·er , cross·est ) cross (with sb) ( especially BrE ) annoyed or quite angry :

I was cross with him for being late.

Please don't get cross . Let me explain.

➡ note at angry

►  cross·ly adverb :

'Well what did you expect?' she said crossly.

••

WORD ORIGIN

late Old English (in the sense monument in the form of a cross ): from Old Norse kross , from Old Irish cros , from Latin crux .

Oxford Advanced Learner's English Dictionary.      Оксфордский английский словарь для изучающик язык на продвинутом уровне.