Meaning of STAGE in English

STAGE

/ steɪdʒ; NAmE / noun , verb

■ noun

PERIOD / STATE

1.

[ C ] a period or state that sth/sb passes through while developing or making progress :

This technology is still in its early stages .

The children are at different stages of development.

The product is at the design stage.

People tend to work hard at this stage of life.

At one stage it looked as though they would win.

Don't worry about the baby not wanting to leave you—it's a stage they go through .

PART OF PROCESS

2.

[ C ] a separate part that a process, etc. is divided into

SYN phase :

We did the first stage of the trip by train.

The police are building up a picture of the incident stage by stage .

The pay increase will be introduced in stages (= not all at once) .

We can take the argument one stage further.

THEATRE

3.

[ C ] a raised area, usually in a theatre, etc. where actors, dancers, etc. perform :

The audience threw flowers onto the stage.

There were more than 50 people on stage in one scene.

They marched off stage to the sound of trumpets.

—see also backstage , offstage , onstage

4.

(often the stage ) [ sing. ] the theatre and the world of acting as a form of entertainment :

His parents didn't want him to go on the stage (= to be an actor) .

She was a popular star of stage and screen (= theatre and cinema / movies) .

IN POLITICS

5.

[ sing. ] an area of activity where important things happen, especially in politics :

She was forced to the centre of the political stage .

Germany is playing a leading role on the international stage .

—see also centre stage

CARRIAGE

6.

[ C ] ( old-fashioned , informal ) = stagecoach

—see also landing stage

IDIOMS

- set the stage for sth

■ verb [ vn ]

1.

to organize and present a play or an event for people to see :

to stage a ceremony / an event / an exhibition

The local theatre group is staging a production of 'Hamlet'.

Birmingham has bid to stage the next national athletics championships.

2.

to organize and take part in action that needs careful planning, especially as a public protest :

to stage a strike / demonstration / march / protest

3.

to make sth happen :

The dollar staged a recovery earlier today.

After five years in retirement, he staged a comeback to international tennis.

••

WORD ORIGIN

Middle English (denoting a floor of a building, platform, or stopping place): shortening of Old French estage dwelling, based on Latin stare to stand. Current senses of the verb date from the early 17th cent.

Oxford Advanced Learner's English Dictionary.      Оксфордский английский словарь для изучающик язык на продвинутом уровне.