Meaning of YOU in English

YOU

I. (|)yü, _yə̇, _yē, in “37 youʸre” usually & in “youʸll” often (|)yu̇; dial (|)yō; the y & a preceding t are usually ch (.t+sh) as in “not you,” the y & a preceding d are usually j (.d+zh) as in “did you” pronoun

Etymology: Middle English you, yow, from Old English ēow, used as dative & accusative of gē you; akin to Middle Dutch u you (used as dative & accusative of gi, ge you), Old High German iu (used as dative of ir you), Old Norse ythr (used as dative & accusative of ēr you), Gothic izwis (used as dative & accusative of jus you), and probably to Latin vos you — more at rendezvous

1.

a. : the one or ones being addressed — used currently and freely as the pronoun of the second person singular or plural in any grammatical relation except that of a possessive; used from Old English times to the 13th or 14th century only as a plural pronoun of the second person in the dative or accusative case as direct or indirect object of a verb or as object of a preposition and still current in this use alongside of other more recently originated uses

I'll meet you there, fellows

we will give you ten minutes to disperse

presents for you two

— used since the 13th or 14th century also as a singular pronoun of the second person as direct or indirect object of a verb or as object of a preposition, at first only as the appropriate form of address to a person of high social status or to a person not well known to the speaker but later without this limitation

I shall … obey you , madam — Shakespeare

can I pour you a cup of tea

a suit tailored just for you

— used since the 14th century also as a plural pronoun of the second person in the nominative case and at any rate since the 16th century also in direct address

you have among you killed a sweet and innocent lady — Shakespeare

stand still, you ever-moving spheres of heaven — Christopher Marlowe

— used since the 15th century also as a singular pronoun of the second person in the nominative case and at any rate since the early 16th century also in direct address, at first only as the appropriate form of address to a person of high social status or to a person not well known to the speaker but later without this limitation

you shall not go, my lord — Shakespeare

stop that, you little pest

— sometimes used as a vague indirect object simply to suggest the concern or involvement of the one or ones being addressed or even with little or no meaning

a civil modest wife, and one … that will not miss you morning nor evening prayer — Shakespeare

he could knock you off forty Latin verses in an hour — W.M.Thackeray

— used like the adjective your with a gerund by speakers and writers on all educational levels though disapproved by some grammarians

there is no point in you waiting any longer

— see ye , your , yours ; compare thee , thou

b.

(1) : yourselves — used reflexively as indirect object of a verb

build you cities — Num 32:24 (Authorized Version)

or object of a preposition

divide it between you

or direct object of a verb

prepare you , lords — Shakespeare

(2) : yourself — used reflexively as indirect object of a verb

you'd better find you another place to hang your hat — T.H.Phillips

or object of a preposition

bring your wife with you

or direct object of a verb

Your Highness shall repose you at the Tower — Shakespeare

2. : one II 1b(1)

when you have summed up all the factors of a man that can be measured you have still not described or understood him — A.L.Nickerson

- for you

- to you

II. ˈyü noun

( -s )

1. : a person indistinguishable from the one being addressed

in everything but outward appearance he is another you

2. : the personality of the person being addressed

the real you

Webster's New International English Dictionary.      Новый международный словарь английского языка Webster.