Meaning of COMMA in English

COMMA

in music, slight difference in frequency (and therefore pitch) occurring when a note of a scale, say E in the scale of C, is derived according to different systems of tuning. There are two commonly cited commas, the Pythagorean comma and the comma of Didymus, or syntonic comma. In Pythagorean tuning, the intervals of the scale are derived from natural fifths (the interval that occurs between the second and third tones of the harmonic series). When natural fifths are constructed in sequence, as from C to G to D. . . , a circle back to C (=B) occurs: . . . A, E, B. This B, however, instead of being exactly in tune with C, is slightly higher, by 0.24 of a semitone. This difference, which is audible, is the Pythagorean comma. Just intonation derives all intervals from natural fifths and natural thirds (the interval between the fourth and fifth tones of the harmonic series). A natural third is slightly lower than the third derived by Pythagorean tuning, which is disagreeable to Western ears. The difference is the comma of Didymus, or syntonic comma, and equals 0.22 of a semitone.

Britannica English vocabulary.      Английский словарь Британика.