Meaning of BUTT in English

BUTT

butt 1

/but/ , n.

1. the end or extremity of anything, esp. the thicker, larger, or blunt end considered as a bottom, base, support, or handle, as of a log, fishing rod, or pistol.

2. an end that is not used or consumed; remnant: a cigar butt.

3. a lean cut of pork shoulder.

4. Slang. the buttocks.

5. Slang. a cigarette.

[ 1400-50; late ME bott (thick) end, buttock, OE butt tree stump (in place names); akin to Sw but stump, Dan but stubby; cf. BUTTOCK ]

butt 2

/but/ , n.

1. a person or thing that is an object of wit, ridicule, sarcasm, contempt, etc.

2. a target.

3. (on a rifle range)

a. a wall of earth located behind the targets to prevent bullets from scattering over a large area.

b. butts , a wall behind which targets can be safely lowered, scored, and raised during firing practice.

4. See butt hinge .

5. Obs. a goal; limit.

v.i.

6. to have an end or projection on; be adjacent to; abut.

v.t.

7. to position or fasten an end (of something).

8. to place or join the ends (of two things) together; set end-to-end.

[ 1350-1400; ME but target, goal, prob. bútr BUTT 1 , from the use of a wooden block or stump as a target in archery, etc. ]

Syn. 1. victim, target, mark, dupe, gull, laughingstock, prey, pigeon, patsy.

butt 3

/but/ , v.t.

1. to strike or push with the head or horns.

v.i.

2. to strike or push something or at something with the head or horns.

3. to project.

4. Mach. (of wheels in a gear train) to strike one another instead of meshing.

5. butt in , to meddle in the affairs or intrude in the conversation of others; interfere: It was none of his concern, so he didn't butt in.

6. butt out , to stop meddling in the affairs or intruding in the conversation of others: Nobody asked her opinion, so she butted out.

n.

7. a push or blow with the head or horns.

[ 1150-1200; ME butten buter, OF boter to thrust, strike botten to strike, sprout ]

butt 4

/but/ , n.

1. a large cask for wine, beer, or ale.

2. any cask or barrel.

3. any of various units of capacity, usually considered equal to two hogsheads.

[ 1350-1400; ME bote bo ( u ) t ( e ); MF bota butta, buttis, akin to Gk boût ( t ) is ]

butt 5

/but/

any of several flatfishes, esp. the halibut.

Also, but .

[ 1250-1300; ME butte; c. SW butta turbot, G Butt brill, turbot, flounder, D bot flounder ]

Random House Webster's Unabridged English dictionary.      Полный английский словарь Вебстер - Random House .