Meaning of RIGHT in English

RIGHT

I. CORRECT, APPROPRIATE, OR ACCEPTABLE

/raɪt/

( rights, righting, righted)

Frequency: The word is one of the 700 most common words in English.

Please look at category 16 to see if the expression you are looking for is shown under another headword.

1.

If something is right , it is correct and agrees with the facts.

That’s absolutely right...

Clocks never told the right time...

The barman tells me you saw Ann on Tuesday morning. Is that right?

= correct

≠ wrong

ADJ

Right is also an adverb.

He guessed right about some things.

ADV : ADV after v

• right‧ly

She attended one meeting only, if I remember rightly.

ADV : ADV after v

2.

If you do something in the right way or in the right place, you do it as or where it should be done or was planned to be done.

Walking, done in the right way, is a form of aerobic exercise...

The chocolate is then melted down to exactly the right temperature.

= correct

≠ wrong

ADJ : usu ADJ n

Right is also an adverb.

To make sure I did everything right, I bought a fat instruction book.

= correctly

ADV : ADV after v

3.

If you say that someone is seen in all the right places or knows all the right people, you mean that they go to places which are socially acceptable or know people who are socially acceptable.

He was always to be seen in the right places...

≠ wrong

ADJ : usu ADJ n

4.

If someone is right about something, they are correct in what they say or think about it.

Ron has been right about the result of every General Election but one...

≠ wrong

ADJ

• right‧ly

He rightly assumed that the boy was hiding.

ADV

5.

If something such as a choice, action, or decision is the right one, it is the best or most suitable one.

She’d made the right choice in leaving New York...

The right decision was made, but probably for the wrong reasons...

≠ wrong

ADJ

• right‧ly

She hoped she’d decided rightly.

ADV : ADV with v

6.

If something is not right , there is something unsatisfactory about the situation or thing that you are talking about.

Ratatouille doesn’t taste right with any other oil...

≠ wrong

ADJ : v-link ADJ , with brd-neg

7.

If you think that someone was right to do something, you think that there were good moral reasons why they did it.

You were right to do what you did, under the circumstances...

≠ wrong

ADJ : v-link ADJ , usu ADJ to-inf

• right‧ly

The crowd screamed for a penalty but the referee rightly ignored them...

ADV : ADV before v , ADV with cl

8.

Right is used to refer to activities or actions that are considered to be morally good and acceptable.

It’s not right, leaving her like this...

≠ wrong

ADJ : v-link ADJ , oft with brd-neg

Right is also a noun.

At least he knew right from wrong.

N-UNCOUNT

• right‧ness

Many people have very strong opinions about the rightness or wrongness of abortion.

N-UNCOUNT : usu N of n

9.

If you right something or if it rights itself , it returns to its normal or correct state, after being in an undesirable state.

They recognise the urgency of righting the economy...

Your eyesight rights itself very quickly.

VERB : V n , V pron-refl

10.

If you right a wrong, you do something to make up for a mistake or something bad that you did in the past.

We’ve made progress in righting the wrongs of the past...

= rectify

VERB : V n

11.

If you right something that has fallen or rolled over, or if it rights itself , it returns to its normal upright position.

He righted the yacht and continued the race...

The helicopter turned at an awful angle before righting itself.

VERB : V n , V pron-refl

12.

The right side of a material is the side that is intended to be seen and that faces outwards when it is made into something.

≠ wrong

ADJ : ADJ n

13.

If you say that things are going right , you mean that your life or a situation is developing as you intended or expected and you are pleased with it.

I can’t think of anything in my life that’s going right...

PHRASE : V inflects

14.

If someone has behaved in a way which is morally or legally right, you can say that they are in the right . You usually use this expression when the person is involved in an argument or dispute.

She wasn’t entirely in the right...

≠ in the wrong

PHRASE : usu v-link PHR

15.

If you put something right , you correct something that was wrong or that was causing problems.

We’ve discovered what’s gone wrong and are going to put it right.

PHRASE : V inflects

16.

heart in the right place: see heart

it serves you right: see serve

on the right side of: see side

II. DIRECTION AND POLITICAL GROUPINGS

/raɪt/

Frequency: The word is one of the 700 most common words in English.

Note: The spelling 'Right' is also used for meaning 3.

1.

The right is one of two opposite directions, sides, or positions. If you are facing north and you turn to the right, you will be facing east. In the word ‘to’, the ‘o’ is to the right of the ‘t’.

Ahead of you on the right will be a lovely garden...

≠ left

N-SING : usu the N

Right is also an adverb.

Turn right into the street.

ADV : ADV after v

2.

Your right arm, leg, or ear, for example, is the one which is on the right side of your body. Your right shoe or glove is the one which is intended to be worn on your right foot or hand.

≠ left

ADJ : ADJ n

3.

You can refer to people who support the political ideals of capitalism and conservatism as the right . They are often contrasted with the left , who support the political ideals of socialism.

The Tory Right despise him...

≠ left

N-SING-COLL : the N

4.

If you say that someone has moved to the right , you mean that their political beliefs have become more right-wing.

They see the shift to the right as a worldwide phenomenon.

≠ left

N-SING : the N

5.

If someone is at a person’s right hand , they work closely with that person so they can help and advise them.

I think he ought to be at the right hand of the president.

PHRASE : usu v-link PHR

III. ENTITLEMENT

/raɪt/

( rights)

Frequency: The word is one of the 700 most common words in English.

1.

Your rights are what you are morally or legally entitled to do or to have.

They don’t know their rights...

You must stand up for your rights.

N-PLURAL : usu poss N

2.

If you have a right to do or to have something, you are morally or legally entitled to do it or to have it.

...a woman’s right to choose...

N-SING : usu N to-inf

3.

If someone has the rights to a story or book, they are legally allowed to publish it or reproduce it in another form, and nobody else can do so without their permission.

An agent bought the rights to his life...

He’d tried to buy the film rights of all George Bernard Shaw’s plays.

N-PLURAL : the N , usu with supp

4.

If something is not the case but you think that it should be, you can say that by rights it should be the case.

She did work which by rights should be done by someone else.

PHRASE : PHR with cl

5.

If someone is a successful or respected person in their own right , they are successful or respected because of their own efforts and talents rather than those of the people they are closely connected with.

Although now a celebrity in her own right, actress Lynn Redgrave knows the difficulties of living in the shadow of her famous older sister...

PHRASE : usu n adj PHR

6.

If you say that you reserve the right to do something, you mean that you will do it if you feel that it is necessary.

He reserved the right to change his mind...

PHRASE : V inflects , PHR to-inf

7.

If you say that someone is within their rights to do something, you mean that they are morally or legally entitled to do it.

You were quite within your rights to refuse to co-operate with him.

= justified

PHRASE : usu v-link PHR

IV. DISCOURSE USES

/raɪt/

Frequency: The word is one of the 700 most common words in English.

1.

You use right in order to attract someone’s attention or to indicate that you have dealt with one thing so you can go on to another. ( SPOKEN )

Right, I’ll be back in a minute...

ADV : ADV cl

2.

You can use right to check whether what you have just said is correct. ( SPOKEN )

They have a small plane, right?

CONVENTION

3.

You can say ‘ right ’ to show that you are listening to what someone is saying and that you accept it or understand it. ( SPOKEN )

‘Your children may well come away speaking with a bit of a broad country accent’—‘Right.’—‘because they’re mixing with country children.’

= yes

ADV : ADV as reply

4.

see also all right

V. USED FOR EMPHASIS

/raɪt/

Frequency: The word is one of the 700 most common words in English.

1.

You can use right to emphasize the precise place, position, or time of something.

The back of a car appeared right in front of him.

...a charming resort right on the Italian frontier...

ADV : ADV adv / prep [ emphasis ]

2.

You can use right to emphasize how far something moves or extends or how long it continues.

...the highway that runs through the Indian zone right to the army positions...

She was kept very busy right up to the moment of her departure...

ADV : ADV prep / adv [ emphasis ]

3.

You can use right to emphasize that an action or state is complete.

The candle had burned right down...

The handle came right off in my hand.

ADV : ADV adv / prep [ emphasis ]

4.

You can use right to emphasize a noun, usually a noun referring to something bad. ( BRIT INFORMAL )

He gave them a right telling off...

= real

ADJ : ADJ n [ emphasis ]

5.

If you say that something happened right after a particular time or event or right before it, you mean that it happened immediately after or before it.

All of a sudden, right after the summer, Mother gets married...

= just

ADV : ADV prep / adv [ emphasis ]

6.

If you say I’ll be right there or I’ll be right back , you mean that you will get to a place or get back to it in a very short time.

I’m going to get some water. I’ll be right back.

ADV : ADV adv [ emphasis ]

7.

If you do something right away or right off , you do it immediately. ( INFORMAL )

He wants to see you right away...

Right off I want to confess that I was wrong.

= straight away

PHRASE : PHR after v , PHR with cl [ emphasis ]

8.

You can use right now to emphasize that you are referring to the present moment. ( INFORMAL )

I’m warning you; stop it right now!

PHRASE : PHR with cl [ emphasis ]

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner's English Dictionary.      Английский словарь Коллинз COBUILD для изучающих язык на продвинутом уровне.