Meaning of ANSWER in English

ANSWER

INDEX:

1. to answer when someone asks you a question or speaks to you

2. to answer a letter, invitation, e-mail etc

3. to answer the telephone/the door

4. to answer a teacher, parent etc in a rude way

5. something you say as an answer

6. something you write as an answer

7. to not answer someone

8. the answer to a question in a test, competition etc

9. to give an answer to a question in a test, competition etc

10. to find or calculate the answer to a question

RELATED WORDS

to find the answer to a problem : ↑ SOLVE

see also

↑ ASK

↑ REACT

◆◆◆

1. to answer when someone asks you a question or speaks to you

▷ answer /ˈɑːnsəʳǁˈæn-/ [intransitive/transitive verb]

to say something to someone when they have asked you a question or spoken to you :

▪ Julie thought for a long time before answering.

▪ I said hello to her, but she didn’t answer.

▪ ‘Why don’t you just leave?’ ‘I’d like to,’ she answered, ‘but I have nowhere else to go.’

▪ How much did you spend? Come on, answer me!

answer a question

▪ You don’t have to answer the question if you don’t want to.

answer that

▪ When questioned about the robbery, Hughes answered that he knew nothing about it.

▷ reply /rɪˈplaɪ/ [intransitive/transitive verb]

to answer someone when they have asked you a question or spoken to you - used especially in written English to report what someone said :

▪ I waited for Smith to reply, but he said nothing.

▪ ‘I’m so sorry,’ he replied.

reply to

▪ The jailers refused to reply to the prisoners’ questions about where they were being taken.

reply that

▪ We asked Jane to help, but she replied that she was too busy.

▷ respond /rɪˈspɒnd tuːǁ-ˈspɑːnd-/ [intransitive/transitive verb]

to answer someone, especially someone who has criticized you or disagreed with you, in a clear and detailed way :

▪ The waitress waited a moment and then responded.

▪ ‘I’d be there if I could,’ Bill responded.

respond to

▪ How do you respond to the allegation that you deliberately deceived your employers?

▪ The meeting will give administrators a chance to respond to the community’s questions and concerns.

respond by saying/telling/asking etc

▪ His father usually responds by telling him to be quiet.

▷ give somebody an answer /ˌgɪv somebody ən ˈɑːnsəʳǁ-ˈæn-/ [verb phrase]

to answer someone by telling them what you have decided or by providing them with the particular piece of information that they have asked for :

▪ They’re offering us a new contract and we have to give them a definite answer by the end of the month.

▪ He didn’t give me a very satisfactory answer

▷ in reply (to)/in answer to/in response to /ɪn rɪˈplaɪ (tuː), ɪn ˈɑːnsəʳ tuːǁ-ˈæn-, ɪn rɪˈspɒns tuːǁ-rɪˈspɑːns-/ [adverb]

if you say or do something in reply to what someone has said, you say or do it as a way of answering their question, request, remark etc :

▪ ‘Where are we going?’ Jill asked. The driver only lifted his hand in reply, as if to silence her.

▪ ‘That won’t be necessary,’ Wilson said in reply to the question.

▪ In response to your question, no, I don’t think a meeting is necessary.

▷ get back to /ˌget ˈbæk tuː/ [transitive phrasal verb]

to answer someone at a later time especially by telephoning them, usually because you need to think about their question or find out more information before you can give an answer :

▪ She’s promised to get back to me as soon as she hears any more news from the hospital.

▪ Tell you what, let me talk it over with the guys and I’ll get back to you.

▷ retort /rɪˈtɔːʳt/ [transitive verb not in progressive] written

to answer someone angrily, especially because they have annoyed you or criticized you :

▪ ‘You’re not afraid?’ Brenda asked. ‘Of course not,’ he retorted angrily.

retort that

▪ Republicans retorted that the amendment is necessary to balance the budget.

2. to answer a letter, invitation, e-mail etc

▷ reply /rɪˈplaɪ/ [intransitive verb]

to write a letter to someone who has written to you, or to someone who has put an advertisement in a newspaper :

▪ I wrote to Franca three weeks ago but she hasn’t replied yet.

reply to

▪ Becky hasn’t replied to our invitation, so I assume she isn’t coming.

▷ answer /ˈɑːnsəʳǁˈæn-/ [transitive verb]

if you answer a letter or advertisement, you write a letter to the person who has written it :

▪ I got the job by answering an advertisement in the paper.

▪ Miss Millar hired a secretary to answer her mail while she was on vacation.

▪ Think carefully before answering that memo.

▷ write back /ˌraɪt ˈbæk/ [intransitive/transitive phrasal verb]

to write a letter to someone who has written a letter to you :

▪ Sara wrote asking if she could help, so I wrote back and said yes.

write back to

▪ Josh, have you written back to Grandma yet?

write somebody back

American

▪ She didn’t really expect him to write her back.

▷ acknowledge /əkˈnɒlɪdʒǁ-ˈnɑː-/ [transitive verb] formal

to write a letter telling someone that you have received a letter, parcel etc that they have sent you :

▪ I have just sent off a letter acknowledging their message.

acknowledge receipt of something

officially acknowledge that you have received something

▪ Please acknowledge receipt of this document by signing and returning the enclosed form.

▷ RSVP/R.S.V.P. /ˌɑːr es viː ˈpiː/ written

please answer this invitation - used at the end of formal invitations when asking someone to say if they can definitely come to a wedding, formal dinner etc :

▪ Dr Fischer requests your company at a dinner to celebrate his retirement at the Dorchester Hotel on November 30th at 10 pm. RSVP.

▷ in response/answer/reply to something /ɪn rɪˈspɒns, ˈɑːnsəʳ, rɪˈplaɪ tə something ǁ-rɪˈspɑːns-, -ˈæn-/ [adverb]

if you say or do something in response to what someone has written, you say or do it as a way of answering their question, request, advertisement etc :

▪ She said she’d come to the office in response to an ad she’d seen in the paper.

▪ In answer to recent criticism the President has issued a statement explaining his policies.

3. to answer the telephone/the door

▷ answer /ˈɑːnsəʳǁˈæn-/ [intransitive/transitive verb]

to pick up the telephone and speak when it rings, or go to the door and open it when someone knocks :

▪ I knocked on the door for a long time, but no one answered.

answer the telephone/a call/the door

▪ A strange man answered the door.

▪ She still isn’t answering my calls.

▷ get /get/ [transitive verb]

to answer the telephone, or go to the door when someone knocks :

get the phone/door

▪ I’ll get the phone. I think it’s for me.

▪ Can someone get the door - I’m in the shower!

get it

spoken answer the phone/door

▪ The phone’s ringing. Do you want me to get it?

▷ take a call /ˌteɪk ə ˈkɔːl/ [verb phrase]

to speak to someone on the telephone because the person that they want to speak to is not available :

▪ I was out that day, and my mother took the call.

▪ Do you want to take the call in your office?

take a call for

▪ Someone wants to speak to Professor Welch, but I can’t find him. Would you take the call for him please.

▷ pick up /ˌpɪk ˈʌp/ [intransitive/transitive phrasal verb] spoken

to answer a phone and talk to the person who is calling :

▪ Come on Bob, pick up! I know you’re there.

pick up the phone

▪ Just pick up the phone and tell her to stop calling you here.

pick it/the phone up

▪ After the phone had rung twice, Joyce picked it up and said hello.

4. to answer a teacher, parent etc in a rude way

▷ answer back/talk back /ˌɑːnsəʳ ˈbækÛ-ˌæn-, ˌtɔːk ˈbæk/ []

to answer someone rudely, especially a teacher, parent etc when they criticize you or tell you to do something :

▪ Don’t talk back. It’s rude.

answer somebody back

▪ We were all scared of Mr Williams, but here was a girl who actually answered him back.

talk back to somebody

▪ Don’t talk back to your mother like that!

▷ back talk also back chat British /ˈbæk tɔːk, ˈbæk tʃæt/ [uncountable noun]

rude remarks that someone makes when they answer their teacher, parent etc :

▪ I don’t want any excuses, complaints, or back talk.

▪ Any more of your back chat and you’ll have to stay behind after school.

5. something you say as an answer

▷ answer /ˈɑːnsəʳǁˈæn-/ [countable noun]

something you say when someone asks you a question or speaks to you :

▪ Each time I ask him when the work will be done, I get a different answer.

▪ I’ve asked Yvonne to come on vacation with us, but I’m still waiting for her answer.

the answer is no/yes

▪ If you’re asking me for money, the answer’s no!

answer to a question

▪ The answer to your question is very simple: you failed the exam because you didn’t do any work.

the answer is (that)

▪ Why don’t people complain? The answer is that they are frightened of losing their jobs.

▷ reply /rɪˈplaɪ/ [countable noun]

something you say when someone asks you a question or speaks to you - use this especially in written English to report what someone has said :

▪ Dr Kleinert murmured a reply, but I couldn’t hear what it was.

▪ ‘I’m just borrowing your black dress, OK?’ said Maxine, without waiting for a reply.

reply to

▪ Railway officials say it isn’t their fault - which is their standard reply to customers’ complaints.

▷ response /rɪˈspɒnsǁrɪˈspɑːns/ [countable noun]

an answer that clearly shows your reaction to a question, suggestion etc :

▪ Wagner’s responses showed that he had thought carefully about the issues.

response to

▪ ‘Sure. Why not?’ was his response to most of Billie’s suggestions.

▷ retort /rɪˈtɔːʳt/ [countable noun] written

an angry or cleverly humorous answer, especially to someone who has made you angry :

▪ Ellie’s angry retort surprised Max.

▪ She could never think of a clever retort to counter Ben’s string of jokes and witticisms.

6. something you write as an answer

▷ reply /rɪˈplaɪ/ [countable noun]

a written answer to a letter, invitation, or advertisement :

▪ We advertised for a secretary in the local paper and got 24 replies.

▪ I wrote to them three weeks ago and I haven’t had a reply back yet.

reply to

▪ It is usual to send a formal reply to a wedding invitation.

▷ answer /ˈɑːnsəʳǁˈæn-/ [countable noun]

a letter that you write back to someone who has asked you for something :

▪ We’ve written to the bank requesting a loan, and we’re expecting an answer in this morning’s mail.

answer to

▪ Did you ever get an answer to your last letter?

▷ acknowledgement /əkˈnɒlɪdʒməntǁ-ˈnɑː-/ [countable noun]

a formal letter or note stating that a letter, parcel etc has been received :

▪ I received an acknowledgement from Toshiba yesterday telling me that they were considering my application for the job.

letter of acknowledgement

▪ He’s still waiting for a letter of acknowledgement of the last cheque he sent them.

▷ response /rɪˈspɒnsǁrɪˈspɑːns/ [countable noun]

an answer that clearly shows your reaction to a question, suggestion etc :

▪ I mailed the letter on Monday and had a response already on Friday.

response to

▪ Write your responses to the questions on the back of the sheet.

7. to not answer someone

▷ not answer /nɒt ˈɑːnsəʳǁ-ˈæn-/ [verb phrase]

▪ ‘What are you doing here?’ The child’s mouth trembled a little, but he did not answer.

not answer somebody/something

▪ I’m afraid I can’t answer that question.

▪ I knew there was something wrong when she didn’t answer me.

▷ no answer/reply/response /nəʊ ˈɑːnsəʳ, rɪˈplaɪ, rɪˈspɒnsǁ-ˈæn-, rɪˈspɑːns/ [noun phrase]

there is no answer/reply/response

▪ I called Stevie’s name but there was no answer.

get no answer/reply/response

▪ He’s written three letters to the mayor, but he’s gotten no response.

▷ make no reply/response/answer /meɪk ˌnəʊ rɪˈplaɪ, rɪˈspɒns, ˈɑːnsəʳǁ-rɪˈspɑːns, -ˈæn-/ [verb phrase]

to deliberately remain silent when someone asks you a question or talks to you :

▪ I greeted Minna, but she made no reply.

▪ Alan tried to start a conversation, but when Lockwood made no response, he gave up.

8. the answer to a question in a test, competition etc

▷ answer /ˈɑːnsəʳǁˈæn-/ [countable noun]

an answer to a question in a test or competition :

▪ Write your answers on the form and send it to this address.

the answer

the correct answer

▪ And the answer is ... Budapest!

answer to

▪ What’s the answer to question 4?

give your answer

▪ Think carefully before you give the answer.

the right/wrong answer

▪ The first person to call with the right answer will win 10 CDs of their choice.

▷ result /rɪˈzʌlt/ [countable noun]

an answer that you have found after calculating or doing tests :

▪ I’ve tried three different ways of adding these figures and each time I get a different result.

▪ We have completed our experiments and we are now analyzing the results.

▪ The results of our accountant’s calculations show that we are on the verge of bankruptcy.

▷ solution /səˈluːʃ ə n/ [countable noun]

the correct answer to a complicated problem in a test or competition :

▪ It was a difficult equation, but it took her only five minutes to work out the solution.

solution to

▪ The solution to this week’s puzzle will be published in next week’s magazine.

9. to give an answer to a question in a test, competition etc

▷ answer /ˈɑːnsəʳǁˈæn-/ [intransitive/transitive verb]

answer a question

▪ You have 20 minutes to answer all the questions.

answer correctly

▪ If you answer correctly, you could win a video camera.

10. to find or calculate the answer to a question

▷ solve /sɒlvǁsɑːlv, sɔːlv/ [transitive verb]

to find the correct answer to a question, problem, or sum by thinking about it carefully or doing calculations :

▪ I’m never going to solve this puzzle - it’s impossible.

▪ According to Greek legend, it was Oedipus who solved the riddle of the Sphinx.

▷ work out/figure out /ˌwɜːʳk ˈaʊt, ˌfɪgər ˈaʊtǁˌfɪgjər-/ [transitive phrasal verb]

to find the answer, usually a number or amount, to a calculation :

work/figure something out

▪ It’s all right, I don’t need a calculator. I can work it out in my head.

▪ I’m sure they owe me more money than that - I’ll have to sit down and figure it out.

work out/figure out something

▪ Using a calculator, work out the answers to the following questions.

Longman Activator English vocab.      Английский словарь Longman активатор .