Meaning of DRIVE in English

DRIVE

INDEX:

1. to drive a car, train, or other vehicle

2. to go somewhere in a car or other vehicle

3. when you take someone somewhere in a car etc

4. someone who drives a car, train etc

5. someone whose job it is to drive a car, train, etc

RELATED WORDS

see also

↑ TRAVEL

↑ ROAD/PATH

↑ ACCIDENT

↑ GET ON OR OFF A BUS, PLANE ETC

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1. to drive a car, train, or other vehicle

▷ drive /draɪv/ [intransitive/transitive verb]

to drive a car, bus, train etc :

▪ Drive carefully - the roads are very icy.

▪ They drive on the left in the UK.

learn to drive

▪ I’m learning to drive. In fact, I take my test next week.

drive a car/bus/truck etc

▪ We need someone to drive the school bus.

▪ ‘What car do you drive?’ ‘A Fiat Brava.’

▪ Driving a Rolls Royce into a swimming pool was one of the most dangerous stunts Crawford had to perform.

▷ driving /ˈdraɪvɪŋ/ [uncountable noun]

the activity of driving a car or other road vehicle :

▪ Driving in central London is pretty unpleasant.

dangerous/reckless/bad/careless driving

▪ She was arrested for dangerous driving.

driving lesson

▪ I got driving lessons for my 18th birthday.

driving offence

▪ The man was stopped by police for an alleged driving offence.

▷ ride /raɪd/ [intransitive/transitive verb]

to drive a vehicle with two wheels, for example a bicycle or motorcycle :

▪ I ride a bicycle to work every day.

▪ Riding a motorcycle is safer than riding a scooter.

▪ After you’ve been riding a bike all day, you’re really glad to reach your campsite.

▷ steer /stɪəʳ/ [intransitive/transitive verb]

to control the direction that a vehicle is going in by turning the wheel :

▪ Even the children had a go at steering the boat.

▪ Steer slightly to the right as you enter the bend.

steering wheel

the part of a car that you turn to change direction

▪ You can adjust the height of the steering wheel.

▷ be behind the wheel/at the wheel /biː bɪˌhaɪnd ðə ˈwiːl, ət ðə ˈwiːl/ [verb phrase]

to be the person who is driving a car, bus etc :

▪ An old Pontiac pulled up, with a young Mexican man at the wheel.

▪ Seymour was glad to be behind the wheel again after his two-year ban.

▷ be at the controls /biː ət ðə kənˈtrəʊlz/ [verb phrase]

to be the person who is driving or controlling a large vehicle such as a plane :

▪ The King himself was at the controls when his helicopter landed.

▪ The power boat, with Don at the controls, swept around the bay.

be at the controls of

▪ When I was a child I used to imagine myself at the controls of a fighter plane.

▷ joyriding /ˈdʒɔɪraɪdɪŋ/ [uncountable noun]

the activity of driving a stolen car very fast and dangerously for excitement :

▪ Joyriding is the most common type of crime among boys under 18.

go joyriding

▪ A group of youths went joyriding in stolen cars, causing three accidents before the police caught them.

joyrider [countable noun]

▪ Joyriders are becoming a serious problem in the inner cities.

2. to go somewhere in a car or other vehicle

▷ drive /draɪv/ [intransitive verb]

to go somewhere in a car :

▪ ‘How do you get to work?’ ‘I drive.’

drive to/from/into/through etc

▪ We drove to the airport, but couldn’t find anywhere to park.

▪ They drove home in silence.

drive off/away

leave somewhere in a car

▪ She drove off without saying goodbye.

drive 50 kilometres/100 miles etc

▪ Was the restaurant worth driving 50 miles for?

drive [countable noun]

a journey in a car :

▪ It’s a two-hour drive to Hamilton from here.

▷ by car/bike etc /baɪ ˈkɑːʳ/ [adverb]

to go somewhere in a car, on a bicycle etc - use this especially when you are comparing different methods of travelling :

▪ One group went by car and the others took a taxi.

▪ I can get to work in about 20 minutes by bike.

▪ I went by boat the first time I went to Tahiti.

▷ cycle /ˈsaɪk ə l/ [intransitive verb]

to go somewhere on a bicycle :

▪ Cycling isn’t only good for the environment - it’s a great form of exercise too.

cycle to/from/through etc

▪ I usually cycle through the park to get to school.

cycle 50 kilometres/10 miles etc

▪ It took about 20 minutes for her to cycle the 5 miles to her home.

▷ go for a drive also take a drive American /ˌgəʊ fər ə ˈdraɪv, ˌteɪk ə ˈdraɪv/ [verb phrase]

to go somewhere in a car, especially for enjoyment :

▪ We’ll go for a drive after lunch and see if we can find this park.

▪ We took a drive down to the ocean.

▷ go for a ride also take a ride American /ˌgəʊ fər ə ˈraɪd, ˌteɪk ə ˈraɪd/ [verb phrase]

to go somewhere in a car or on a bicycle especially for enjoyment :

▪ When you’ve finished your work, shall we take a ride?

▪ It was unusual that someone should be taking a ride on a stormy night like this.

3. when you take someone somewhere in a car etc

▷ take/drive somebody somewhere /ˈteɪk, ˈdraɪv somebody sʌmweəʳ/ [verb phrase]

▪ Could you take me to the station, please?

▪ The President was driven away in a big black limousine.

drive somebody home/back

▪ He always expected his girlfriend to drive him home at the end of the night.

▷ lift /lɪft/ especially British /ride /raɪd/ American [countable noun]

if you give someone a lift or a ride, you take them somewhere in your car :

▪ Never accept lifts from strangers.

give somebody a lift/ride

▪ Pedro stopped to give me a lift.

lift to

▪ Do you need a ride to school?

a lift/ride home

▪ I accepted her offer of a lift home.

▷ carpool /ˈkɑːʳpuːl/ [countable noun]

a group of car owners who agree to drive everyone in the group to work on different days, so that only one car is used at a time :

▪ I’ve been in a carpool with the same three women for ten years.

carpool lane

part of a road that only people who share cars can use

▪ a proposal to open up a new network of carpool lanes

carpool [intransitive verb] American :

▪ We should encourage more people to carpool.

carpooling [uncountable noun]

the practice of driving everyone in a group to work on different days :

▪ Despite efforts to promote carpooling, 70% of all commuters drive to work alone.

4. someone who drives a car, train etc

▷ driver /ˈdraɪvəʳ/ [countable noun]

someone who regularly drives or is driving a car, train, etc :

▪ Many drivers suffer from backache.

▪ The car was almost torn in half in the crash but amazingly the driver was unhurt.

▪ Car drivers now pay more than ever for fuel.

▪ Some women drivers are concerned about their personal safety.

driver’s seat/door/side etc

▪ He got into the driver’s seat and started the engine.

▷ motorist /ˈməʊt ə rɪst, ˈməʊt ə rəst/ [countable noun]

someone who drives a car - use this especially to talk about the costs of driving or the laws that affect driving :

▪ Motorists are developing the habit of buying a new car every other year.

▪ Safety needs to be improved, not only for motorists but also for pedestrians.

the motorist

all motorists

▪ The countryside is being destroyed for the benefit of the motorist.

▷ motorcyclist /ˈməʊtəʳˌsaɪklɪst, ˈməʊtəʳˌsaɪkləst/ [countable noun]

someone who rides a motorcycle :

▪ Three motorcyclists dressed in black rode past.

▪ The President’s car arrived with its escort of police motorcyclists.

▷ rider /ˈraɪdəʳ/ [countable noun]

someone who rides a bicycle or motorcycle :

▪ The rider wasn’t badly hurt, but his bicycle was all smashed- up.

▪ The leading rider in this year’s motorcycle championship is Wayne Rainey.

▷ cyclist /ˈsaɪklɪst, ˈsaɪkləst/ [countable noun] especially British

someone who rides a bicycle :

▪ Most cyclists in London have their bikes stolen eventually.

▪ Cyclists are demanding more and safer cycle paths in the city.

a keen cyclist

▪ Heather, a keen cyclist, is hoping to raise £10,000 by riding her bike across Europe.

5. someone whose job it is to drive a car, train, etc

▷ driver /ˈdraɪvəʳ/ [countable noun]

▪ The limousine pulled up outside the church and the driver got out.

truck/lorry etc driver

▪ A lot of truck drivers stop at this restaurant because it’s open all night.

cab/taxi/bus etc driver

▪ Harry asked the cab driver to stop outside the store for a couple of minutes while he bought a paper.

▷ chauffeur /ˈʃəʊfəʳ, ʃəʊˈfɜːʳ/ [countable noun]

someone whose job is to drive a car for someone else :

▪ I’ll learn to drive and be some film star’s chauffeur.

▪ a chauffeur-driven Rolls Royce

Longman Activator English vocab.      Английский словарь Longman активатор .