Meaning of END in English

END

I

verb

1

BAD : The film was ended at eight-thirty.

GOOD : The film ended at eight-thirty.

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The verb end is usually intransitive: 'The war ended in 1975.' 'When does the next programme end?' 'Just as the film was ending, the baby woke up.'

When end is transitive, it means 'finish or stop something': 'I couldn't decide how to end the letter.' 'To end the meal we had some coffee and an ice-cream.'

2

BAD : Since nobody would lend me the money, I ended asking my father for it.

GOOD : Since nobody would lend me the money, I ended up asking my father for it.

BAD : The trouble with smoking is that you end with making a habit of it.

GOOD : The trouble with smoking is that you end up making a habit of it.

BAD : Nowadays very few criminals end in jail.

GOOD : Nowadays very few criminals end up in jail.

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end = finish or cause (something) to finish: 'The lessons usually end at five o'clock but some teachers end their lessons early.'

end up = (1) be forced to do something (after everything else has failed): 'For months she refused to pay us any rent, so we ended up taking her to court.' (2) eventually find yourself in a particular place or condition: 'If you don't stop smoking, you'll end up in hospital.'

II

noun

1

BAD : At the end I decided not to go.

GOOD : In the end I decided not to go.

BAD : In the end of the dinner someone made a speech.

GOOD : At the end of the dinner someone made a speech.

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FINALLY · IN THE END · EVENTUALLY · AT LAST · AFTER ALL · AT THE END

Finally and lastly are used (1) at the beginning of a sentence) to introduce the past point in a speech, reply, essay etc: ‘finally, I’d like to consider the economic arguments.’ ‘Lastly, I’d like to thank you all for coming and wish you a safe journey home.’ (2) to introduce the last action in a sequence of actions or the last thing in a list: ‘Finally, as soon as you hear a beep, press the start button.’ ‘She showed us the new dress, then the blouse, and lastly the shoes.

Finally and eventually are used to show that something happens after a long time or delay: ‘When the bus finally arrived it was full up.’ ‘Eventually the baby stopped crying and we managed to get some sleep.’

Eventually and in the end are used to introduce the result or outcome of something: ‘In the end United won by three goals to two.’ ‘It seems more and more likely that the human race will eventually destroy itself.’

At last means ‘after a long period of waiting or trying to do something’: ‘I’m pleased to hear that you are out of hospital at last.’ Unlike eventually, at last is often used in connection with the present situation, and expresses a sense of relief: ‘I can’t believe that we’re actually getting on the plane at last.’ ‘Do you mean that you’ve really stopped smoking at last?’

After all means ‘despite what was planned, expected or believed’: ‘We stayed at home after all and watched the match on television.’ ‘I’m sorry to hear that you won’t be coming to London after all.’ After all is also used to remind someone of a fact which they should consider: ‘I’m not surprised you’re tired. After all, you didn’t get any sleep last night.’ ‘Why are you so upset about losing? After all, it’s only a game.’

At the end At the end refers to the point where something finishes: ‘Their house is at the end of the road.’ ‘Do you remember what happens at the end of the film?’ Unlike in the end, at the end is usually followed by of : ‘at the end of the lesson/course/road/year’.

2

BAD : In the end, I would like to wish you all a very interesting and enjoyable stay.

GOOD : Finally, I would like to wish you all a very interesting and enjoyable stay.

Longman Common Errors English vocabulary.      Английский словарь распространенных ошибок Longman.