Meaning of PULL in English

PULL

/ pʊl; NAmE / verb , noun

■ verb

MOVE / REMOVE STH

1.

to hold sth firmly and use force in order to move it or try to move it towards yourself :

[ v ]

You push and I'll pull.

Don't pull so hard or the handle will come off.

I pulled on the rope to see if it was secure.

[ vn ]

Stop pulling her hair!

She pulled him gently towards her.

[ vn - adj ]

Pull the door shut.

2.

[ vn , usually + adv. / prep. ] to remove sth from a place by pulling :

Pull the plug out.

She pulled off her boots.

He pulled a gun on me (= took out a gun and aimed it at me) .

3.

[ vn + adv. / prep. ] to move sb/sth in a particular direction by pulling :

Pull your chair nearer the table.

He pulled on his sweater.

She took his arm and pulled him along.

4.

[ vn ] to hold or be attached to sth and move it along behind you :

In this area oxen are used to pull carts.

BODY

5.

[+ adv. / prep. ] to move your body or a part of your body in a particular direction, especially using force :

[ v ]

He tried to kiss her but she pulled away.

[ vn ]

The dog snapped at her and she quickly pulled back her hand.

[ vn - adj ]

John pulled himself free and ran off.

CURTAINS

6.

[ vn ] to open or close curtains, etc.

SYN draw :

Pull the curtains—it's dark outside.

MUSCLE

7.

[ vn ] to damage a muscle, etc. by using too much force :

to pull a muscle / ligament / tendon

➡ note at injure

SWITCH

8.

[ vn ] to move a switch, etc. towards yourself or down in order to operate a machine or piece of equipment :

Pull the lever to start the motor.

Don't pull the trigger!

VEHICLE / ENGINE

9.

pull (sth) to the right / the left / one side to move or make a vehicle move sideways :

[ v ]

The wheel is pulling to the left.

[ vn ]

She pulled the car to the right to avoid the dog.

10.

[ v ] ( of an engine ) to work hard and use a lot of power :

The old car pulled hard as we drove slowly up the hill.

BOAT

11.

[usually + adv. / prep. ] to use oars to move a boat along :

[ v ]

They pulled towards the shore.

[also vn ]

CROWD / SUPPORT

12.

[ vn ] pull sb/sth (in) to attract the interest or support of sb/sth :

They pulled in huge crowds on their latest tour.

ATTRACT SEXUALLY

13.

( BrE , informal ) to attract sb sexually :

[ vn ]

He can still pull the girls.

[ v ]

She's hoping to pull tonight.

TRICK / CRIME

14.

[ vn ] ( informal ) to succeed in playing a trick on sb, committing a crime, etc. :

He's pulling some sort of trick on you.

CANCEL

15.

[ vn ] ( informal ) to cancel an event; to stop showing an advertisement, etc. :

The gig was pulled at the last moment.

IDIOMS

- pull a fast one (on sb)

- pull in different / opposite directions

- pull sb's leg

- pull the other one (—it's got bells on)

- pull out all the stops

- pull the plug on sb/sth

- pull your punches

- pull sth / a rabbit out of the hat

- pull rank (on sb)

- pull the rug (out) from under sb's feet

- pull your socks up

- pull strings (for sb)

- pull the strings

- pull up stakes

- pull your weight

- pull the wool over sb's eyes

—more at bootstrap , face noun , horn , piece noun , shred noun

PHRASAL VERBS

- pull ahead (of sb/sth)

- pull sb/sth apart

- pull sth apart

- pull at sth

- pull away (from sth)

- pull back

- pull sb back

- pull back | pull sth back

- pull sb down

- pull sth down

- pull sb in

- pull sth in / down

- pull in (to sth)

- pull off | pull off sth

- pull sth off

- pull on / at sth

- pull out

- pull out (of sth)

- pull sb/sth out (of sth)

- pull over

- pull sb/sth over

- pull through | pull through sth

- pull sb through | pull sb through sth

- pull together

- pull yourself together

- pull up

- pull sb up

■ noun

TRYING TO MOVE STH

1.

[ C ] an act of trying to make sth move by holding it firmly and bringing it towards you :

I gave the door a sharp pull and it opened.

PHYSICAL FORCE

2.

[ sing. ] the ~ (of sth) a strong physical force that makes sth move in a particular direction :

the earth's gravitational pull

ATTRACTION

3.

[ C , usually sing. ] the ~ (of sth) the fact of sth attracting you or having a strong effect on you :

The magnetic pull of the city was hard to resist.

INFLUENCE

4.

[ U ] ( informal ) power and influence over other people :

people who have a lot of pull with the media

ON CIGARETTE / DRINK

5.

[ C ] pull (at / on sth) an act of taking a deep breath of smoke from a cigarette, etc. or a deep drink of sth :

She took a long pull on her cigarette.

WALK UP HILL

6.

[ C , usually sing. ] ( BrE ) a difficult walk up a steep hill :

It's a long pull up to the summit.

MUSCLE INJURY

7.

[ C ] an injury to a muscle caused by using too much force

HANDLE / ROPE

8.

[ C ] (especially in compounds) something such as a handle or rope that you use to pull sth :

a bell / door pull

—see also ring pull

IDIOMS

- on the pull

••

SYNONYMS

pull

drag ♦ draw ♦ haul ♦ tow ♦ tug

These words all mean to move sth in a particular direction, especially towards or behind you.

pull

to hold sth and move it in a particular direction; to hold or be attached to a vehicle and move it along behind you:

Pull the chair nearer the table.

They use oxen to pull their carts.

drag

to pull sb/sth in a particular direction or behind you, usually along the ground, and especially with effort:

The sack is too heavy to lift—you'll have to drag it.

draw

( formal ) to move sb/sth by pulling them / it gently; to pull a vehicle such as a carriage:

I drew my chair closer to the fire.

a horse-drawn carriage

haul

to pull sb/sth to a particular place with a lot of effort:

Fishermen were hauling in their nets.

drag or haul?

You usually drag sth behind you along the ground; you usually haul sth towards you, often upwards towards you. Dragging sth often needs effort, but hauling sth always does.

tow

to pull a car, boat or light plane behind another vehicle, using a rope or chain:

Our car was towed away by the police.

tug

to pull sb/sth hard in a particular direction:

She tried to escape but he tugged her back.

PATTERNS AND COLLOCATIONS :

to pull / drag / draw / haul / tow / tug sth back / away / out

to pull / drag / draw / haul / tow / tug sb/sth along / down / towards sth

to pull / drag / draw / haul / tow sb/sth behind you

to pull / draw a coach / carriage / sledge

to pull / haul / tow a truck

to pull / haul a train

horses pull / draw / haul sth

dogs pull / drag / haul sth

engines / locomotives pull / haul sth

••

WORD ORIGIN

Old English pullian pluck, snatch ; origin uncertain; the sense has developed from expressing a short sharp action to one of sustained force.

Oxford Advanced Learner's English Dictionary.      Оксфордский английский словарь для изучающик язык на продвинутом уровне.