Meaning of PUSH in English

PUSH

/ pʊʃ; NAmE / verb , noun

■ verb

USING HANDS / ARMS / BODY

1.

[often + adv. / prep. ] to use your hands, arms or body in order to make sb/sth move forward or away from you; to move part of your body into a particular position :

[ v ]

We pushed and pushed but the piano wouldn't move.

Push hard when I tell you to.

She pushed at the door but it wouldn't budge.

You push and I'll pull.

[ vn ]

He walked slowly up the hill pushing his bike.

She pushed the cup towards me.

He pushed his chair back and stood up.

He tried to kiss her but she pushed him away.

She pushed her face towards him.

[ vn - adj ]

I pushed the door open.

2.

[+ adv. / prep. ] to use force to move past sb/sth using your hands, arms, etc. :

[ v ]

The fans pushed against the barrier.

People were pushing and shoving to get to the front.

[ vn ]

Try and push your way through the crowd.

AFFECT STH

3.

[ vn + adv. / prep. ] to affect sth so that it reaches a particular level or state :

This development could push the country into recession.

The rise in interest rates will push prices up.

SWITCH / BUTTON

4.

[ vn ] to press a switch, button, etc., for example in order to make a machine start working :

I pushed the button for the top floor.

PERSUADE

5.

push sb (into sth / into doing sth) | push sb (to do sth) to persuade or encourage sb to do sth that they may not want to do :

[ vn ]

My teacher pushed me into entering the competition.

[ vn to inf ]

No one pushed you to take the job, did they?

WORK HARD

6.

[ vn ] to make sb work hard :

The music teacher really pushes her pupils.

Lucy should push herself a little harder.

PUT PRESSURE ON SB

7.

[ vn ] ( informal ) to put pressure on sb and make them angry or upset :

Her parents are very tolerant, but sometimes she pushes them too far.

NEW IDEA / PRODUCT

8.

[ vn ] ( informal ) to try hard to persuade people to accept or agree with a new idea, buy a new product, etc. :

The interview gave him a chance to push his latest movie.

She didn't want to push the point any further at that moment.

SELL DRUGS

9.

[ vn ] ( informal ) to sell illegal drugs

OF ARMY

10.

[ v + adv. / prep. ] to move forward quickly through an area :

The army pushed (on) towards the capital.

IDIOMS

- be pushing 40, 50, etc.

- be pushing up (the) daisies

- push the boat out

- push the envelope

- push your luck | push it / things

- push sth to the back of your mind

—more at button verb , panic button

PHRASAL VERBS

- push sb about / around

- push ahead / forward (with sth)

- push sth aside

- push sth back

- push for sth | push sb for sth

- push forward

- push yourself / sb forward

- push in

- push off

- push on

- push sb out

- push sb/sth out

- push sth out

- push sb/sth over

- push sth through

■ noun

USING HANDS / ARMS / BODY

1.

an act of pushing sth/sb :

She gave him a gentle push.

The car won't start. Can you give it a push?

At the push of a button (= very easily) he could get a whole list of names.

OF ARMY

2.

a large and determined military attack :

a final push against the enemy

( figurative )

The firm has begun a major push into the European market.

EFFORT

3.

push for sth a determined effort to achieve sth :

The push for reform started in 1989.

4.

encouragement to do sth :

He wants to open his own business, but needs a push in the right direction to get him started.

IDIOMS

- at a push

- give sb / get the push

- when push comes to shove

••

WORD ORIGIN

Middle English (as a verb): from Old French pousser , from Latin pulsare to push, beat, pulse (see the verb pulse ). The early sense was exert force on , giving rise later to make a strenuous effort, endeavour .

Oxford Advanced Learner's English Dictionary.      Оксфордский английский словарь для изучающик язык на продвинутом уровне.