Meaning of SHOP in English

SHOP

/ ʃɒp; NAmE ʃɑːp/ noun , verb

■ noun

WHERE YOU BUY STH

1.

[ C ] ( especially BrE ) a building or part of a building where you can buy goods or services :

a shoe shop

There's a little gift shop around the corner.

( BrE )

a butcher's shop

( NAmE )

a butcher shop

( BrE )

I'm just going down to the shops . Can I get you anything?

—see also bakeshop , bucket shop , coffee shop , corner shop , factory shop

FOR MAKING / REPAIRING THINGS

2.

(also work·shop ) [ C ] (especially in compounds) a place where things are made or repaired, especially part of a factory where a particular type of work is done :

a repair shop

a paint shop (= where cars are painted)

—see also body shop

SHOPPING

3.

[ sing. ] ( BrE , informal ) an act of going shopping, especially for food and other items needed in the house :

I do a weekly shop at the supermarket.

SCHOOL SUBJECT

4.

(also ˈshop class ) [ U ] (both NAmE ) = industrial arts

ROOM FOR TOOLS

5.

(also work·shop ) [ C ] ( NAmE ) a room in a house where tools are kept for making repairs to the house, building things out of wood, etc.

IDIOMS

- all over the shop

- set up shop

—more at bull , hit verb , mind verb , shut verb , talk verb

■ verb

( -pp- )

BUY

1.

[ v ] shop (for sth) to buy things in shops / stores :

to shop for food

He likes to shop at the local market.

She was determined to go out and shop till she dropped .

2.

go shopping [ v ] to spend time going to shops / stores and looking for things to buy :

There should be plenty of time to go shopping before we leave New York.

'Where's Mum?' 'She went shopping.'

TELL POLICE ABOUT SB

3.

[ vn ] shop sb (to sb) ( BrE , informal ) to give information to sb, especially to the police, about sb who has committed a crime :

He didn't expect his own mother to shop him to the police.

PHRASAL VERBS

- shop around (for sth)

••

WORD ORIGIN

Middle English : shortening of Old French eschoppe lean-to booth, of West Germanic origin; related to German Schopf porch and English dialect shippon cattle shed . The verb is first recorded (mid 16th cent.) in the sense imprison (from an obsolete slang use of the noun for prison ), which led to sense 3.

Oxford Advanced Learner's English Dictionary.      Оксфордский английский словарь для изучающик язык на продвинутом уровне.