Meaning of COURSE in English

COURSE

noun

1

BAD : I'm taking an intermediate course of English.

GOOD : I'm taking an intermediate course in English.

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a course in/on sth (NOT of ): 'I've been attending an evening course in business studies.' 'I'm interested in doing a correspondence course in English and Maths.' 'There is also a two-day course on new technology for teachers.'

2

BAD : The boys and girls in my English course come from all over the world.

GOOD : The boys and girls on my English course come from all over the world.

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In British English you say that someone is on a course : 'Some of the people on the course came to a few classes and then dropped out.'

Note that in a course is used in American English.

3

DUBIOUS : We'll probably go to the cinema or to a discotheque. Of course, since Fiona is my guest, I'll let her decide.

GOOD : We'll probably go to the cinema or to a discotheque. Naturally, since Fiona is my guest, I'll let her decide.

DUBIOUS : The construction of a new motorway is totally unnecessary and of course the local residents are completely against the idea.

GOOD : The construction of a new motorway is totally unnecessary and, as one would expect, the local residents are completely against the idea.

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Of course is generally over-used. Common words and phrases that may be used as alternatives include: naturally, obviously, clearly, certainly, evidently, predictably, as you/one would expect, as is to be expected, as you know, it is clear/obvious that.

Longman Common Errors English vocabulary.      Английский словарь распространенных ошибок Longman.