Meaning of UNFAIR in English

UNFAIR

un ‧ fair S3 /ˌʌnˈfeə◂ $ -ˈfer◂/ BrE AmE adjective

[ Word Family: adverb : ↑ fairly ≠ ↑ unfairly , ↑ fair ; noun : ↑ fairness ≠ ↑ unfairness ; adjective : ↑ fair ≠ ↑ unfair ]

not right or fair, especially because not everyone has an equal opportunity SYN unjust :

an unfair advantage

laws aimed at preventing unfair competition

Many employers have recognized that age discrimination is unfair.

She won £20,000 for unfair dismissal (=being illegally made to leave your job) .

—unfairly adverb :

Mrs Taylor believes her son has been unfairly treated.

The tribunal decided that Mr Matthews had been unfairly dismissed.

—unfairness noun [uncountable]

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COLLOCATIONS

■ adverbs

▪ very/most unfair

We live in a very unfair world.

▪ totally unfair

It’s totally unfair to blame one player when the team doesn’t play well.

▪ extremely/grossly unfair

The system was extremely unfair.

▪ a little/slightly unfair ( also a bit unfair British English spoken )

You’re being slightly unfair on him.

▪ blatantly/manifestly/demonstrably unfair (=clearly unfair)

The newspaper called the judge’s ruling ‘blatantly unfair.’

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THESAURUS

▪ unfair/not fair not right or fair, especially because not everyone has an equal opportunity:

The present welfare system is grossly unfair.

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It’s not fair that people are paying different prices for the same tickets.

▪ unjust not fair or right according to the principles of a particular society:

He believed it was an illegal and unjust war.

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unjust laws

▪ unequal unfair because people are treated in different ways or because some people have more power than others:

We live in a deeply unequal society.

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the unequal distribution of global resources

▪ inequitable formal unfair because people are treated in different ways, or because some people have more power than others:

inequitable tax laws

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The system is inequitable, because it makes it possible for rich people to buy a place at university.

▪ biased unfairly against or in favour of a particular group:

biased reporting

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There were claims that prison bosses were racially biased.

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The policy was biased against women.

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The trade laws are biased in favour of rich countries.

■ treating people unfairly because of their race, sex, age etc

▪ prejudiced treating someone unfairly and having an unreasonable dislike of them because of their race, sex etc, or because they are old, disabled etc:

The media had very prejudiced attitudes towards disabled people.

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I don’t want to sound prejudiced, but I do think women are better at this type of job.

▪ racist treating someone unfairly because of their race:

racist remarks

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Children pick up racist attitudes from their parents.

▪ sexist treating someone unfairly because of their sex:

He had made sexist comments to several women in the office.

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The show was about two female inspectors who had trouble with their sexist bosses.

▪ ageist treating someone unfairly because of their age – used especially when old people are unfairly treated:

Ageist attitudes result in older people being discriminated against in the workplace.

▪ homophobic treating someone unfairly because they are homosexual:

Many of his songs are homophobic.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English.      Longman - Словарь современного английского языка.