Meaning of COCK in English

COCK

I. ˈkäk noun

Etymology: Middle English cok, from Old English cocc, of imitative origin

Date: before 12th century

1.

a. : the adult male of the domestic chicken ( Gallus gallus )

b. : the male of birds other than the domestic chicken

c. : woodcock

d. archaic : the crowing of a cock ; also : cockcrow

e. : weathercock

2. : a device (as a faucet or valve) for regulating the flow of a liquid

3.

a. : a chief person : leader

b. : a person of spirit and often of a certain swagger or arrogance

4.

a. : the hammer in the lock of a firearm

b. : the cocked position of the hammer

5. usually vulgar : penis

- cock of the walk

II. verb

Date: 1575

intransitive verb

1. : strut , swagger

2. : to turn, tip, or stick up

3. : to position the hammer of a firearm for firing

transitive verb

1.

a. : to draw the hammer of (a firearm) back and set for firing ; also : to set (the trigger) for firing

b. : to draw or bend back in preparation for throwing or hitting

a quarterback cock ing his arm

cock a bat

c. : to set a mechanism (as a camera shutter) for tripping

2.

a. : to set erect

a dog with one ear cock ed

b. : to turn, tip, or tilt usually to one side

cock one's head

3. : to turn up (as a hat brim)

- cock a snook

III. noun

Date: 1717

: tilt , slant

cock of the head

IV. noun

Etymology: Middle English cok; akin to German dialect Kocke pile

Date: 14th century

: a small pile (as of hay)

V. transitive verb

Date: 14th century

: to put (as hay) into cocks

Merriam-Webster's Collegiate English vocabulary.      Энциклопедический словарь английского языка Merriam Webster.