Meaning of COCK in English

COCK

I. ˈkäk noun

( -s )

Etymology: Middle English cok, from Old English cocc; probably akin to obsolete Dutch cocke cock, Old Norse kokr; all of imitative origin

1.

a. : the adult male of the domestic fowl ( Gallus gallus ) — distinguished from cockerel

b. : the male of birds other than the domestic fowl, especially of other gallinaceous birds

c. : woodcock — usually used without regard to sex

d. archaic : the crowing of a cock ; also : cockcrow 1

e. : a representation of a cock ; specifically : weathercock

2. : a faucet, tap, valve, or similar device for starting, stopping, or regulating the flow of a liquid

a ball cock

a sill cock

an automobile radiator cock

sometimes : the amount of opening permitted by or as if by a cock

a faucet turned on full cock

3.

a. : one occupying a position of success and control : victor ; often : one dominating some field or leading some circle usually through determined aggressive individual effort

b. : a person of pluck and spirit and often a certain swagger or arrogance

all the young cocks dashing in new uniforms

— often especially formerly used as a term of intimate address

you're sure doing fine, old cock

4.

a. in older firearms : the hammer in the lock of a firearm

b. : the cocked position of the hammer

a gun at half cock

5.

a. : penis — usually considered vulgar

b. chiefly South & Midland : the female pudenda — usually considered vulgar

6.

a. : gnomon 1a

b. : an overhanging bracket containing a bearing for a watch or clock arbor or a wheel bridge supported at one end only

7.

[perhaps short for cock-and-bull story ]

slang Britain : nonsense , poppycock

“you were talking some awful cock about righteousness ,” the brigadier said — Bruce Marshall

- cock of the walk

II. adjective

1. : male — used of birds and sometimes of other animals

cock lobster

2. : chief , leading , top

a cock swordsman

a cock wencher

his house, having been cock house at football for three years running, is very likely to be beaten next winter — Joyce Cary

III. verb

( -ed/-ing/-s )

Etymology: Middle English cocken, from cok (I) cock, male fowl

intransitive verb

1. : to act big, arrogant, or menacing : strut , swagger

did a lot of bragging and cocking after winning the game

2. : to turn, tip, or stick up

the show horse's abbreviated tail cocking almost straight up

[tubes] may be badly scratched in handling and mounting and may cock in the fixture — C.J.Phillips

a common failing with two-wheeled traps was cocking, a tendency to tip up when in use so that the shafts pointed upwards and the tailboard down — Hugh McCausland

3. : to position the hammer of a firearm for firing

transitive verb

1.

a. obsolete : to put (the match) into the cock of a matchlock gun

b. : to draw the hammer of (a firearm) fully back and set it for firing ; also : to set (the trigger) for firing

c. : to draw or bend back (as the arm, the wrist, or by extension something held in the hand) in preparation to throw or hit

a boxer with his fist cocked

a forward passer cocking his arm to throw

a ballplayer at the plate with his bat cocked

cock the wrists at the top of the backswing in golf

d. : to set a trip mechanism (as a camera shutter) for tripping

2.

a. : to set erect especially with a certain jaunty conspicuousness

a peafowl cocked its tail feathers

a dog with one ear cocked

b. : to turn, tip, or tilt usually to one side especially alertly, jauntily, or defiantly

the engine was cocked over at an angle of 60 degrees from the vertical — Eugene Jaderquist

a hat cocked over his right ear

an eye incessantly cocked on the main chance — R.L.Cook

c. : to lift and place high (as the feet)

leaning back and cocking his feet up on his desk — James Jones

3. : to turn up (as the brim of a hat)

4. of a cricket batsman : to hit or deflect (a bowled ball) in the air unintentionally and usually rather weakly — used with up

cock up an easy catch

- cock a snook

IV. noun

( -s )

: tilt , slant

the jaunty cock of his hat

cock of the head

V. noun

( -s )

Etymology: Middle English cok, alteration (influenced by cok cock, male fowl) of God

obsolete : god — used in oaths often in the possessive form which is sometimes spelled cox

by Cock!

by Cock's soul!

by Cox bones!

VI. noun

( -s )

Etymology: Middle English cok, of Scandinavian origin; akin to Danish kok pile; akin to Old High German coccho pile, Lithuanian guga pommel of a saddle, Old English cot den, cottage — more at cot

: a small pile especially of hay, dung, or turf

VII. transitive verb

( -ed/-ing/-s )

: to put (as hay) into cocks

VIII. noun

( -s )

Etymology: Middle English cok, from Old French coque, coche, from Medieval Latin caudica, from Latin caudic-, caudex trunk of a tree — more at code

obsolete cock-boat

IX. verb

( -ed/-ing/-s )

Etymology: probably from (assumed) Old North French coquer to notch, from (assumed) Old North French, coque, n., notch — more at coak

: cog VII

Webster's New International English Dictionary.      Новый международный словарь английского языка Webster.