Meaning of ORDER in English

ORDER

/ ˈɔːdə(r); NAmE ˈɔːrd-/ noun , verb

■ noun

ARRANGEMENT

1.

[ U , C ] the way in which people or things are placed or arranged in relation to each other :

The names are listed in alphabetical order .

in chronological / numerical order

arranged in order of priority / importance / size

The results, ranked in descending / ascending order are as follows:

All the procedures must be done in the correct order.

Let's take the problems in a different order.

2.

[ U ] the state of being carefully and neatly arranged :

It was time she put her life in order .

The house had been kept in good order.

Get your ideas into some sort of order before beginning to write.

It is one of the functions of art to bring order out of chaos.

OPP disorder

CONTROLLED STATE

3.

[ U ] the state that exists when people obey laws, rules or authority :

The army has been sent in to maintain order in the capital.

Some teachers find it difficult to keep their classes in order .

The police are trying to restore public order.

The argument continued until the chairman called them both to order (= ordered them to obey the formal rules of the meeting) .

—compare disorder (2)

—see also point of order

INSTRUCTIONS

4.

[ C ] order (for sb to do sth) | order (to do sth) something that sb is told to do by sb in authority :

He gave orders for the work to be started.

The general gave the order to advance.

Dogs can be trained to obey orders .

She takes orders only from the president.

I'm under orders not to let anyone in.

( informal )

No sugar for me— doctor's orders .

Interest rates can be controlled by order of the central bank.

GOODS

5.

[ C , U ] order (for sth) a request to make or supply goods :

I would like to place an order for ten copies of this book.

an order form

The machine parts are still on order (= they have been ordered but have not yet been received)

These items can be made to order (= produced especially for a particular customer)

—see also mail order

6.

[ C ] goods supplied in response to a particular order that sb has placed :

The stationery order has arrived.

FOOD / DRINKS

7.

[ C ] a request for food or drinks in a restaurant, bar etc.; the food or drinks that you ask for :

May I take your order ?

Last orders at the bar now please! (= because the bar is going to close)

an order for steak and fries

a side order (= for example, vegetables or salad that you eat with your main dish)

MONEY

8.

[ C ] a formal written instruction for sb to be paid money or to do sth

—see also banker's order , court order , money order , postal order , standing order

SYSTEM

9.

[ C , usually sing. ] ( formal ) the way that a society, the world, etc. is arranged, with its system of rules and customs :

a change in the political and social order

the natural order of things

He was seen as a threat to the established order .

A new order seems to be emerging.

SOCIAL CLASS

10.

[ C , usually pl. ] ( disapproving or humorous ) a social class :

the lower orders

BIOLOGY

11.

[ C ] a group into which animals, plants, etc. that have similar characteristics are divided, smaller than a class and larger than a family :

the order of primates

—compare genus

RELIGIOUS COMMUNITY

12.

[ C +sing./pl. v . ] a group of people living in a religious community, especially monks or nuns :

religious orders

the Benedictine order

SPECIAL HONOUR

13.

[ C +sing./pl. v . ] a group of people who have been given a special honour by a queen, king, president, etc. :

The Order of the Garter is an ancient order of chivalry.

14.

[ C ] a badge or ribbon worn by members of an order who have been given a special honour

SECRET SOCIETY

15.

[ C +sing./pl. v . ] a secret society whose members meet for special ceremonies :

the Ancient Order of Druids

IDIOMS

- be in / take (holy) orders

- in order

- in order (to do sth)

- in order that

- in order to do sth

- in running / working order

- of a high order | of the highest / first order

- of / in the order of sth

- the order of the day

- Order! Order!

- out of order

—more at call verb , house noun , law , march verb , peck verb , short noun , starter , tall

■ verb

GIVE INSTRUCTIONS

1.

to use your position of authority to tell sb to do sth or say that sth must happen :

[ vn to inf ]

The company was ordered to pay compensation to its former employees.

The officer ordered them to fire.

[ vn ]

They were ordered out of the class for fighting.

The government has ordered an investigation into the accident.

[ v that ]

They ordered that for every tree cut down two more be planted.

( BrE also)

They ordered that for every tree cut down two more should be planted.

[ v speech ]

'Sit down and be quiet,' she ordered.

[also vn speech ]

GOODS / SERVICE

2.

order (sb) sth | order sth (for sb) to ask for goods to be made or supplied; to ask for a service to be provided :

[ vn ]

These boots can be ordered direct from the manufacturer.

[ vnn , vn ]

Shall I order you a taxi?

Shall I order a taxi for you?

FOOD / DRINK

3.

order (sb sth) | order (sth) (for sb) to ask for sth to eat or drink in a restaurant, bar, etc. :

[ vn ]

I ordered a beer and a sandwich.

[ vnn ]

He ordered himself a double whisky.

[ v ]

Have you ordered yet?

ORGANIZE / ARRANGE

4.

[ vn ] ( formal ) to organize or arrange sth :

I need time to order my thoughts

—see also ordered , disordered

IDIOMS

see doctor noun

PHRASAL VERBS

- order sb about / around

••

SYNONYMS

order

tell ♦ instruct ♦ direct ♦ command

These words all mean to use your position of authority to say to sb that they must do sth.

order

to use your position of authority to tell sb to do sth:

The company was ordered to pay compensation to its former employee.

'Come here at once!' she ordered.

tell

to say to sb that they must or should do sth:

He was told to sit down and wait.

Don't tell me what to do!

instruct

( rather formal ) to tell sb to do sth, especially in a formal or official way:

The letter instructed him to report to headquarters immediately.

direct

( formal ) to give an official order:

The judge directed the jury to return a verdict of not guilty.

command

to use your position of authority to tell sb to do sth:

He commanded his men to retreat.

order or command?

Order is a more general word than command and can be used about anyone in a position of authority, such as a parent, teacher or government telling sb to do sth. Command is slightly stronger than order and can suggest that there is some opposition to the order, or would be if opposition were allowed. It is the normal word to use about an army officer giving orders, or in any context where it is normal to give orders without any discussion about them. It is less likely to be used about a parent or teacher.

PATTERNS AND COLLOCATIONS :

to order / tell / instruct / direct / command sb to do sth

to order / tell / instruct / direct / command sb that...

to order / instruct / direct / command that...

to do sth as ordered / told / instructed / directed / commanded

••

WORD ORIGIN

Middle English : from Old French ordre , from Latin ordo , ordin- row, series, rank.

Oxford Advanced Learner's English Dictionary.      Оксфордский английский словарь для изучающик язык на продвинутом уровне.