Meaning of MORTAR in English

MORTAR

I. ˈmȯr]d.ər, ˈmȯ(ə)]d.ə(r, ]tə- noun

( -s )

Etymology: Middle English morter, from Old English mortere & Middle French mortier, from Latin mortarium mortar, vessel in which substances are pounded or rubbed, plastic building material that hardens and is used in masonry, trough in which mortar is mixed; akin to Greek marainein to waste away — more at smart

1.

a. : a small usually bowl-shaped vessel made of a hard material (as porcelain or brass) in which substances are pounded or rubbed with a pestle

b. : a large cast-iron receptacle in which ore is crushed in a stamp mill

2. archaic

a. : a bowl of oil with a floating wick

b. : a thick candle

3.

[Middle French mortier muzzle-loading cannon having a tube short in relation to its caliber, vessel in which substances are pounded or rubbed]

a. : a muzzle-loading cannon having either a rifled or smooth bore and a tube short in relation to its caliber that is used to throw projectiles with low muzzle velocities at high angles

b. : any of several similar firing devices used for various purposes (as to throw a lifeline or to fire pyrotechnic bombs or shells)

II. verb

( -ed/-ing/-s )

transitive verb

: to direct mortar fire upon or to hit with mortar shells

the enemy … was mortaring a crossroads behind our lines and interfering with our movements — C.C.Wertenbaker

the leading tank … radioed it had been mortared — Life

intransitive verb

: to fire mortars

can expect the mortaring to begin any minute — Ned Calmer

III. noun

( -s )

Etymology: Middle English morter, from Old French mortier, from Latin mortarium

1. : a plastic building material that hardens and is used in masonry or plastering ; especially : a mixture of cement, lime, or gypsum plaster with sand and water that is used in either the plastic or hardened state

the masons are calling for mortar — Walt Whitman

2. : something that binds or holds together

our dreams are built solidly with the mortar of our toil and blood — Stuart Cloete

moral and spiritual values … the mortar which holds together the other educational ingredients — Educational and Psychological Measurement

IV. ˈmȯrtər\ verb

( -ed/-ing/-s )

Etymology: Middle English morteren, from morter, n.

transitive verb

: to plaster or make fast with mortar

intransitive verb

dialect England : to tramp about especially with mud or dirt on one's feet

keep mortarin' in and out, in and out, for everlastin' trampin' through — H.E.Bates

Webster's New International English Dictionary.      Новый международный словарь английского языка Webster.