Meaning of RETURN in English

RETURN

INDEX:

1. to go to the place where you were before

2. to go back to a place that you have visited before

3. when you return somewhere

4. a journey back to the place where you started

5. a ticket that allows you to go somewhere and to return to where you started

RELATED WORDS

to give something back : ↑ GIVE (11)

to take someone or something back to the place they came from : ↑ TAKE (4)

to put something back in the place where it was before : ↑ PUT (2)

see also

↑ HOME

↑ TRAVEL

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1. to go to the place where you were before

▷ go back /ˌgəʊ ˈbæk/ [intransitive phrasal verb]

▪ I left my hometown 12 years ago, and I have no desire to go back.

go back to

▪ When will you be going back to Japan?

go back for

▪ We’ll have to go back for the tickets - I think I left them on the desk.

go back in/out/inside/downstairs etc

▪ It’s cold out here - shall we go back inside?

▪ The phone started ringing again as soon as I went back upstairs.

go back the way you came

▪ Part of the trail was flooded, so we had to go back the way we had come.

go back home

▪ Frank’s gone back home to visit his parents and won’t be back for a week.

▷ come back /ˌkʌm ˈbæk/ [intransitive phrasal verb]

if someone comes back, they return to the place where you are :

▪ Rachel’s left me, and I don’t think she’ll ever come back.

come back to

▪ When will you be coming back to London?

come back from

▪ He’s just come back from a vacation in Miami.

come back for

▪ Whoever left the gloves will probably come back for them tomorrow.

▷ return /rɪˈtɜːʳn/ [intransitive verb]

to go back or come back to the place where you were before. Return is used more in written or formal contexts than go back or come back :

▪ I left early, but promised to return the next day.

return to

▪ He had to return to India to look after his mother.

return from

▪ Alastair returned from the office late that night.

return home

▪ As the soldiers returned home, their wives had to readjust to living with them again.

▷ go home /ˌgəʊ ˈhəʊm/ [verb phrase]

to return to your home or to the country where you were born :

▪ It’s late - I should go home now.

▪ John used to go home once a month when he was at college.

go home to

▪ I’ve enjoyed my time in Europe, but I’m really looking forward to going home to America.

▷ get in/get home /ˌget ˈɪn, ˌget ˈhəʊm/ [verb phrase]

to return to the house where you live :

▪ What time did you get in last night?

▪ I usually get home about 7:30 - you can try calling me after that.

get in/get home from

▪ He hasn’t had anything to eat yet. He just got home from work.

▷ be back /biː ˈbæk/ [verb phrase]

to be in the place where you were before you went away :

▪ Jack! What a surprise! How long have you been back?

▪ Carol is away on business, but she should be back next week.

▪ We’ll get together when you’re back from vacation.

▷ back /bæk/ [adverb]

run/drive/fly/walk etc back

go back to where you were before by running, driving etc :

▪ We took the train to Paris, but flew back.

back to/from etc

▪ We cycled back from the beach in the evening.

▪ It was a beautiful day, so I decided to walk back to the office.

2. to go back to a place that you have visited before

▷ return/go back /rɪˈtɜːʳn, ˌgəʊ ˈbæk/ [intransitive verb/intransitive phrasal verb]

▪ China was fascinating - I hope I’ll be able to return one day.

return/go back for

▪ The dentist says I have to go back again next week for a check up.

return/go back to do something

▪ These birds return to the same place every year to build their nests.

▪ He’ll have to go back to Moscow in June to finalize the deal.

▷ revisit /riːˈvɪzɪt, riːˈvɪzət/ [transitive verb]

to go back to a place that you have been to before, especially a place that you like and that you have not visited for a long time :

▪ Maria was eager to revisit her first school.

▪ They revisited many of the places they had gone to on their honeymoon.

3. when you return somewhere

▷ somebody’s return / somebodyˈs rɪˈtɜːʳn/ [noun phrase] formal :

▪ We eagerly await your return.

▪ Immediately after his return he was forced to do his military service.

on somebody’s return

when they return

▪ On her return, she found that someone had broken into her apartment.

sb’s return from

▪ Albertson died within one year of his return from Africa.

▷ homecoming /ˈhəʊmˌkʌmɪŋ/ []

your return to your home or to the country where you were born after you have been away for a long time, especially when this is celebrated in some way :

▪ We arranged a party for my brother’s homecoming, when he returned from five years in Australia.

▪ Coming back for her uncle’s funeral was not a happy homecoming for her.

4. a journey back to the place where you started

▷ return /rɪˈtɜːʳn/ [adjective only before noun]

return journey/trip/flight etc

:

▪ The sea was much calmer on the return voyage.

▪ The return trip took about an hour less than the trip there.

▷ there and back /ˌðeər ən ˈbæk/ [adverb]

to a place and back again to the place that you started from :

▪ How long will it take to drive there and back?

▪ ‘How far is it to Milwaukee?’ ‘It’s about 30 miles there and back.’

5. a ticket that allows you to go somewhere and to return to where you started

▷ return/return ticket /rɪˈtɜːʳn, rɪˌtɜːʳn ˈtɪkə̇t/ [countable noun] British

a ticket that includes your return journey :

▪ How much is a return ticket to Dublin?

▪ Would you like singles or returns, Sir?

return [adverb]

▪ It costs $475 return to Helsinki for a return ticket to Helsinki .

▷ round-trip ticket /ˈraʊnd ˌtrɪp tɪkə̇t/ [countable noun] American

a ticket that includes your return journey :

▪ There’s no point in buying a one-way ticket when a round-trip ticket is the same price.

round-trip [adverb]

▪ The ferry costs only $5 round-trip per person.

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