Meaning of BEAR in English

BEAR

I. verb

COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES

a compass bearing/reading (= a direction shown by a compass )

We took a compass bearing to ensure we were walking in the right direction.

ball bearing

bear a scar formal (= have it on your body )

He still bore the scars of its teeth on his leg.

bear a slogan (= have a slogan printed on something )

a badge bearing a campaign slogan

bear a/some similarity to sth (= be like something )

The murder bore a striking similarity to another shooting 25 miles away.

bear claw

bear hug

bear little/no resemblance to sb/sth

He bore little resemblance to the photograph in the newspaper.

bear market

bear no relation to reality (= not match what is really happening or true )

His vision of European politics bears no relation to reality.

bear no/little relationship to sth

The allegations bore no relationship to the facts.

bear resentment (= feel it )

My father's favourite was my younger sister, and I'd always borne him some resentment for this.

bear responsibility for sth (= be responsible for something bad )

Developed countries must bear much of the responsibility for environmental problems.

bear signs of sth (= have signs )

The bed was neatly made and bore no signs of having been slept in.

Bear Stearns

bear the hallmark of

Their performance did not bear the hallmark of European champions.

bear the suspense

She couldn’t bear the suspense a moment longer.

bear/carry a grudge

Wallace said the rumors had been started by someone who bore a grudge against him.

bear/carry a watermark

The sheet bears the watermark ‘1836’.

bear/carry/shoulder the burden (= be responsible for something )

At the age of 16, Suzy bore the burden of providing for her family.

bear/have a resemblance to sb/sth

People said he bore a striking resemblance to the President.

bear/hold etc no grudge

He insisted that he held no grudge against Taylor.

bearing in mind (= because of )

More money should be given to housing, bearing in mind the problem of homelessness.

bore...malice (= did not feel any malice towards her )

James bore her no malice .

bore...the stamp of (= had )

The speech bore the stamp of authority.

bring pressure to bear on sb (= put pressure on them )

These groups have brought pressure to bear on the government.

can’t bear the thought of sth

I can’t bear the thought of you being hurt.

carry/bear scars (= to suffer from feelings of fear or sadness )

These children will carry their emotional scars with them for the rest of their lives.

full bore

Kate took a huge slice and was going at it full bore.

grizzly bear

have...crosses to bear

I feel sorry for you, but we all have our crosses to bear .

hold/bear sth aloft

He emerged, holding a baby aloft.

meet/bear the cost of sth (= pay for something, especially with difficulty )

His family were unable to meet the cost of his operation.

not stand up to scrutiny/not bear scrutiny (= be found to have faults when examined )

Such arguments do not stand up to careful scrutiny.

polar bear

teddy bear

COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS

■ ADVERB

hardly

She could hardly bear to listen to them, smiling Clyde, amiable Harvey, fat Marlene.

Heartrending, Rob thought; he could hardly bear to look.

The two sides of the equation did not balance and she could hardly bear the implications of that.

I am so homesick I can hardly bear it.

At school the next day I hurt so much I could hardly bear to stay sitting down.

I remember being filled with such excitement I could hardly bear it.

What that will do to Strachan's nerves hardly bears thinking about.

He could hardly bear to go on.

■ NOUN

brunt

A recent report showed how older workers bear the brunt of economic recession.

It will bear the brunt of the estimated $ 1 billion cost for the changes on Okinawa.

The depot is bearing the brunt of a package of cost cutting measures across three sites.

Southern California, where the banks had the most overlap, will bear the brunt of the cuts.

He thought that the garrison of Richmond ought now to bear the brunt of the fighting.

Millions of carers argue that they bear the brunt of the job ... without recognition, or proper payment.

Retailers are in the immediate line of fire and were first to bear the brunt of cost cutting.

burden

Those people may have roughly the same income and circumstances and they may all be able to bear the same burden .

To what extent are the various taxes shifted and who bears the ultimate burden ?

People can not afford to bear a heavier burden , and we shall not put a heavier burden on them.

Wives bore a greater burden in dealing with these daily difficulties than did their preoccupied husbands.

If this applies, small indexed sequential files bear a heavy burden compared with larger files.

Some have struggled all their lives, and now are forced to bear this unexpected burden during retirement.

Is the potential for misidentification any less when the defence bear the burden of proof?

He went further and said that the prosecution bore that burden whenever the issue of prejudice through delay was raised.

child

Others develop the feeling of bearing a child more gradually.

Reproductive system After the menopause, women are no longer able to bear children , as their ovaries stop releasing eggs.

Quintana, who works at a car wash, said she bore her first child at age 13.

Next, their wives were fed since they could bear more children .

She bore two children , was banished from the colony and yet reappeared later.

She was a lady of unearthly beauty who married a Count of Anjou and bore him four children .

Even if women are raped, he says, they should be legally required to bear the children .

cost

And who will bear the cost ?

Such action forces potential offenders, under the threat of legal action, to bear all the costs associated with their production.

The buyers therefore had to bear the costs of the deterioration.

Instead, landowner Peter Dillingham will bear the cost .

A long debate determines who will be unlucky and bear the cost of eggs rather than sperm.

Retailers are in the immediate line of fire and were first to bear the brunt of cost cutting.

The insured must bear the costs of the Engineers fees unless liability is subsequently established under the policy.

The Society are now seeking a skilled modeller to carry out this work and have undertaken to bear the costs involved.

costs

The buyers therefore had to bear the costs of the deterioration.

In terms of our organizational behavior model, costs bring the fear of low performance immediately to bear .

The Legal Aid Fund bears the costs risk rather than the litigant.

Such action forces potential offenders, under the threat of legal action, to bear all the costs associated with their production.

For the moment, capital was bearing the costs of overaccumulation.

Other terms Purchaser and vendor to bear their own costs .

The insured must bear the costs of the Engineers fees unless liability is subsequently established under the policy.

Any exports to the mainland have to bear high transport costs .

cross

We all have our crosses to bear .

Was this his Cross to bear ?

Each symbol was placed in front of larger crosses bearing the name and crest of the unit or group.

He says it's a cross to bear .

Look - you've got your cross to bear , all right, I've got mine.

Thought it has a supportive county council and a productive work force, yet it has its cross to bear .

A tall stone cross on the site bears the following dedication: To the Brave of Both Nations.

fruit

Some investment does not bear fruit .

They began to see that devoting time and energy to this endeavor bore fruit .

The first is that the policies have largely been implemented as intended and that they are bearing fruit .

What contacts there are do not always bear fruit .

Whether the 90s will bear further fruit remains to be seen.

It bears fruit continuously throughout the growing season.

The years of work and attention were bearing fruit now, and suddenly this stroke of luck with Betty.

Never would she let the earth bear fruit until she had seen her daughter.

grudge

Drought-lovers are natural container plants and will not bear a grudge if you forget to water them.

Otis, who bore lifelong grudges over provocations infinitely smaller than this, was realistic enough to know when he was had.

It would not do to have Miss Blagden imagine she bore any grudge .

Does some one bear a grudge against Vallejo?

Lets hope they don't bear a grudge !

He said both men came from deprived backgrounds and bore a grudge against the area in which they lived.

Guenelon bears a grudge in his heart, which eventually blossoms into a scheme for revenge.

Y/N 7 I am willing to forgive people who have upset me and do not bear grudges against them.

hallmark

It also bears the hallmarks of a long-cherished project.

The attack bore all the hallmarks of a loyalist murder bid.

Whatever it was, it didn't bear the hallmark of life in Knockglen.

In singling out gay men, the offence bears the hallmarks of homophobic prejudice, and belongs to the less tolerant era.

Cricket is primarily a man's game, bearing all the hallmarks of male camaraderie.

The sculptures bear all the hallmarks of the Braun workshop and date from 1713-19.

But they said the type of attack bore all the hallmarks of the I-R-A.

It does not, in other words, bear the hallmarks of Thatcherism.

influence

Nor was noble influence brought to bear only in moments of crisis.

Campaigning can bring political influences to bear on the students that might affect them detrimentally. 3.

The outside influences have no bearing on what you can do for your basketball team....

He also wrote letters to bring the full weight of the family's influence to bear on Cambridge University.

All sorts of influences are brought to bear upon us every time we turn on the radio or open a newspaper.

mark

A large piece of whale blubber, bearing the marks of fleshing knives, has been discovered off west Falkland.

The imam still bore the mark of that experience in his gaunt frame and sallow, jaundiced complexion.

The great Leinster dinner service of 1747 was his swansong: no silver bearing his mark appears thereafter.

Products graded in accordance with established standards bear the appropriate grade marks .

And her body, bearing one tiny mark , had been found with a bird's head, near the barrow.

Krupat's face, which I knew so well, bore some recent marks .

Some of you have the look of lords, yet you bear the mark of hard travelling and your steeds are scarred.

None the less, nationalization still bore the mark of long struggles by the labour movement to further working class interests.

mind

You should also bear in mind that social security payments might be higher abroad.

And bear in mind that it was an hour later and in the middle of the week.

And while that would seem to leave Jen open to offers, bear in mind that she can be a difficult customer.

The Home Secretary should bear in mind the fact that this case is subjudice.

Meredith, bearing in mind Harriet's warning that this horse might kick, prudently moved away a little.

I have no authority to do that in a half-day debate, but perhaps hon. Members will bear it in mind .

We should bear in mind continually that the whole field is controversial.

To approach this question, we bear in mind the principle that variability in language is socially functional.

name

He devised a set of heavy draft horse casting hobbles which are now outmoded but still bear his name .

The Lechmere chain traces its roots to merchant Abraham Cohen, who opened a harness store that bore his name in 1913.

The large old building, with its sign over the door bearing the Grenfell name , stood silent and empty.

Croix, who was dizzy and nauseated when he penciled in the river that bears his name .

Each symbol was placed in front of larger crosses bearing the name and crest of the unit or group.

Conoco currently operates in 37 states from Texas to Montana, with 5, 125 service stations bearing the Conoco name .

There was a second edition in 1803, bearing Coleman's name .

They all bore the name of the same author.

pressure

He brought undue pressure to bear on his parents by giving them an entirely misleading account of the documents.

With all the pressure brought to bear upon them, both President Lincoln and General Halleck stood by me....

This concession would not have happened but for the pressure brought to bear on the authorities.

In London Channel 4 journalists and Insight News, the production company, brought pressure to bear .

As consumers in a capitalist society we have great power to bring pressure to bear .

On his eastern border, Ine brought pressure to bear on the eastern Saxons who were sheltering exiles from his kingdom.

Those groups have brought pressure to bear on government to provide resources or pursue policies to the benefit of their members.

No pressure was brought to bear on visitors who were reluctant to co-operate.

relation

The yardage on the card often bears little relation to the club you select.

The punishment in this instance is not arbitrary; it bears some relation to the punishable behavior.

They bear little enough relation to the land that now lies west of Jerusalem.

It bore no relation to the equivalent of aerodynamic facts, namely, anthropological evidence as a whole.

Hence the amount of Business Rate each local authority receives will bear no relation to the amount actually collected in each area.

This bull market bears no relation to that gambling spree.

The picture bore no relation to the blotchy, snotty, shouting face of angry childhood.

Furthermore, who told the stories about whom seemed to bear some relation to the conventional pecking order.

relationship

This chapter has reviewed a wide range of research which may bear on relationships between subjective risk and memory for driving situations.

Why is life so unfair-whether you live or die bears no relationship to what kind of person you are.

The available statistical evidence bears out this crude relationship between years of education and earnings.

The symbols used in a language are arbitrary and bear no relationship to what they represent.

Availability of resources and their actual use seem frequently to bear little relationship to each other.

Expiatory punishment is arbitrary in character because it does not bear any relationship to the offense.

They too complain of pain whose severity bears little or no relationship to the tissue destruction.

resemblance

The oldest Tertiary rocks contained archaic mammals that bore no resemblance to the living families within the class.

The rumors bore an uncanny resemblance to whatever people feared most.

I say nuclear catastrophe partly because any exchange of nuclear arsenals will bear no resemblance to anything that could be called war.

But his co-defendant, Terry Nichols, bears no resemblance to the sketch of John Doe 2.

And he was helped by the fact that he bears a slight resemblance to the blond singer in Abba, too.

She bore little resemblance to the fashionable woman she had been just a few weeks ago.

They say that the handwriting at the top bears no resemblance to that of any Press office staff.

Citations commonly bore little resemblance to events.

responsibility

No one likes to bear the responsibility for such decisions.

It was hard to tell which side bore more responsibility for the disorders, the police or the rioters.

Ironically, the papacy must bear some responsibility for these developments.

But women bear some responsibility , too.

But he bears primary responsibility for tax and economic policies that lost Labour the election.

In the past, the companies have said they bear no responsibility for the actions of dealers who sell guns.

It was as though she were dead and he bore the responsibility for killing her.

He must bear primary responsibility for the chaos that descended upon the White House when such disclosure did occur.

scar

His twice broken kneecap still bears the scars - for Lawrence today was the test he's been waiting for.

All bore ugly scars from repeated knife fights on the streets and in the dives around Clinton Avenue.

This boat was used in an Indiana Jones film and still bears the scars .

She still bore the scars of battle, a battle she had nearly lost.

He had only ever been discovered once and still bore the scars on his wrist from the Alsatian's razor-sharp-teeth.

He still bore the scars of her teeth on his calf and upper thigh.

And within a week Aseta was playing again-though she still bears the scar today.

Many people bear permanent scars from such encounters.

similarity

If this was Richard's first experience of war it bore an ironical similarity to his last.

They say the cases bear no similarity .

The interiors of these churches are tall and dark and bear strong similarities to inverted ships.

In fact, of course, much of this material bore only a tenuous similarity to its genuinely customary counterparts.

This description bears marked similarities to those offered by a number of eminent sociologists who adopt the trait approach.

son

Eleven months later she bore his son .

She would bear him a son named Epaphus, and live for ever after happy and honored.

He further conquered her by ensuring she fell in love with him, and she bore him three sons .

After she died in 1647, a new wife bore him one more son in his sixtieth year.

She was jealous that I was to bear her husband's son - I could not hate her for that.

She bore him one posthumous son .

Somehow that was easier to bear than a son .

For example, the ability to bear sons remained important in early twentieth-century farming communities.

stamp

It did not, now, bear the stamp of Duncan on it.

His early work, produced between 1930 and 1933, bears the stamp of sectarianism.

In the first two weeks of January 1992, 18 more people were killed in murders bearing the stamp of death squads.

The scheme bore the unmistakable stamp of Kurt Hahn and his trust system that Charles had seen in operation at Gordonstoun.

How could she produce anything that bore the stamp of continuity and at the same time managed to be fresh and original?

Wycliffe lifted out a man's wrist watch and a little wad of letters still in their envelopes and bearing foreign stamps .

Such cheques will bear the bank's stamp and a bank official's signature on their face.

thought

Riley, Riley, I can't bear the thought of your leaving.

You couldn't bear the thought of a chit of a girl sweeping in and scooping the jackpot.

And she couldn't bear the thought of being sucked back into the ebb tide of loneliness again either.

He simply can not bear the thought of his hated enemy getting hold of young Adam.

I can't bear the thought of Batty playing against Leeds.

I couldn't bear the thought that it was you he loved.

She longed to encounter some other human presence and could not bear the thought of it.

weight

But to my mind neither section 8 nor the Gillick decision will bear the weight which he seeks to place upon them.

I went down the steps, slowly, enjoying the way each step bore my weight .

Yet these will hardly bear the weight of a theory so grand as the fusion of legacy and trust.

Differences that had seemed slight when they were in their early twenties now bore social weight .

The Hooper who existed in Brideshead Revisited, though, bore all the weight of Waugh's opprobrium.

If the floor is properly framed, you should not need extra support underneath to bear the weight of the fireplace.

As a foundation it is inadequate to bear the weight of the case that Mr. McGregor sought to build upon it.

His arms were numb, his hands too weak to bear his weight .

witness

I did not steal or bear false witness .

There, too, literature bears witness .

Sparrow's books bear witness to his movement in the most exclusive circles.

They also bear witness to trade over long distances.

The Prisoner of Zenda and its sequel certainly bear witness to their author's craftsmanship.

Those empty houses bore mute witness to the violence of the times.

The Mutawas, clothed in self-righteousness, were there to bear witness to the appropriate punishment.

Half way across the site, the earth is scorched, and the remnants of dwellings bear witness to a horrendous fire.

■ VERB

bring

This would bring financial pressure to bear on his friends and family, and besides it was profitable.

Mummy and I will bring our guns to bear .

There is a finite amount of government resources we can bring to bear .

Anyway, on with my story, for soon other pressures were to be brought to bear .

In bringing the arts to bear on his discussion, Hardison shines brightly.

Employers brought maximum pressure to bear on workers in order to restore order: recalcitrant strikers faced lockouts.

He asserts that he is: bringing to bear the precision of photography in the illustration of our subject.

grin

We just have to grin and bear it.

It's not exactly affectionate, but we Limeys can grin and bear it.

But she was not on the tour, so I had to grin and bear it.

And up to now, you've had to quit or grin and bear it.

Abu Salim decided that a third day wasn't necessary so I had to grin and bear it.

There was no alternative but to grin and bear it.

After debate the team concluded that they had to grin and bear it rather than descend into paranoia.

PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES

be borne in on/upon sb

bear the mark of sth

A large piece of whale blubber, bearing the marks of fleshing knives, has been discovered off west Falkland.

None the less, nationalization still bore the mark of long struggles by the labour movement to further working class interests.

Some of you have the look of lords, yet you bear the mark of hard travelling and your steeds are scarred.

The imam still bore the mark of that experience in his gaunt frame and sallow, jaundiced complexion.

bear/keep sb/sth in mind

Bobcat. Keep that in mind .

But they keep Soviet might in mind , however remote the threat now seems.

If he had ... no conclusions yet, just bear it in mind .

It is important to bear this in mind in any study of the role of school governors in meeting special educational needs.

It is important to keep your audience in mind when writing a report.

They might bear that in mind .

To keep it in mind , at all costs.

We've got to bear it in mind .

bear/take/suffer etc the brunt of sth

Group comportment had deteriorated by the day, with yours truly bearing the brunt of the collective delinquency.

He thought that the garrison of Richmond ought now to bear the brunt of the fighting.

Her hands, which she threw up to protect her face took the brunt of the injury.

It will bear the brunt of the estimated $ 1 billion cost for the changes on Okinawa.

Retailers are in the immediate line of fire and were first to bear the brunt of cost cutting.

Southern California, where the banks had the most overlap, will bear the brunt of the cuts.

The depot is bearing the brunt of a package of cost cutting measures across three sites.

The front of the car, and those in it, took the brunt of the impact.

bore sb silly

bore/scare etc the pants off sb

He wasn't interested in the heavy political stuff which bored the pants off most people.

It took ten minutes to reach Honey Cottage, with Yanto trying his best to scare the pants off Mary.

Lovely people who scared the pants off him.

The tests scare the pants off many managers.

Though, mind you, it scares the pants off poor old Crumwallis.

have a/some/no etc bearing on sth

And that it might have some bearing on what has happened now.

But the facts of the past seemed to have no bearing on the facts of the present.

It has come to have a bearing on the larger questions of civilized survival.

Party political factors, professionalism and the dispositions of key personalities all usually have some bearing on internal management structures.

The availability of security may, however, have a bearing on whether or not a particular loan will be granted.

The observations on immortality in Chapter Thirteen may be seen to have some bearing on this.

The outside influences have no bearing on what you can do for your basketball team....

This year's form will have a bearing on all future claims.

water-borne/sea-borne/air-borne etc

EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES

A messenger arrived, bearing a letter from the ambassador.

An oak table bore several photographs of the family.

At the head of the procession a group of dark-suited men bore the coffin into the church.

He bore the pain stoically.

Her loneliness was hard to bear , after her husband died.

I really can't bear him.

Jean will never be able to bear children.

My leg really hurts -- I'm not sure how much longer I can bear it.

Several of the guests arrived bearing gifts.

She bears the title of "Executive Director."

Talking to a counsellor can help divorcees to bear the pain of separation.

The baby's narrow neck looked too fragile to bear the weight of its head.

The ice wasn't thick enough to bear his weight.

The list bore the names of people still missing after the disaster.

The melon rind bore traces of a rare type of the Salmonella bacteria.

The police are asking residents to keep an eye out for a person bearing this description.

The trial was a great scandal but she bore it all with courage and dignity.

The tunnel would have needed to be extremely strong to bear the full weight of the earth above.

They arrived in Israel on the same plane that bore Assad's coffin.

EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS

A close scrutiny of films showing lions killing zebras does not bear this out.

Dissident radicals of all sorts were assumed to bear loyalty to alien ideologies, and deportation became the fate of many.

For Blanche the atmosphere bore no resemblance to the glamorous, fun-filled evening promised in the advertisements.

I can not bear it any longer, I am crying now.

Never would she let the earth bear fruit until she had seen her daughter.

Some products that bear freshness dates are cheeses, breakfast cereals, bakery products, and mayonnaise.

There Charles went solo again, unveiling a plaque - which bore both their names - as Diana stood meekly behind him.

You know, as in, which one bore more excitement and panache.

II. noun

PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES

be borne in on/upon sb

bear the mark of sth

A large piece of whale blubber, bearing the marks of fleshing knives, has been discovered off west Falkland.

None the less, nationalization still bore the mark of long struggles by the labour movement to further working class interests.

Some of you have the look of lords, yet you bear the mark of hard travelling and your steeds are scarred.

The imam still bore the mark of that experience in his gaunt frame and sallow, jaundiced complexion.

bear-baiting/badger-baiting etc

bear/keep sb/sth in mind

Bobcat. Keep that in mind .

But they keep Soviet might in mind , however remote the threat now seems.

If he had ... no conclusions yet, just bear it in mind .

It is important to bear this in mind in any study of the role of school governors in meeting special educational needs.

It is important to keep your audience in mind when writing a report.

They might bear that in mind .

To keep it in mind , at all costs.

We've got to bear it in mind .

bear/take/suffer etc the brunt of sth

Group comportment had deteriorated by the day, with yours truly bearing the brunt of the collective delinquency.

He thought that the garrison of Richmond ought now to bear the brunt of the fighting.

Her hands, which she threw up to protect her face took the brunt of the injury.

It will bear the brunt of the estimated $ 1 billion cost for the changes on Okinawa.

Retailers are in the immediate line of fire and were first to bear the brunt of cost cutting.

Southern California, where the banks had the most overlap, will bear the brunt of the cuts.

The depot is bearing the brunt of a package of cost cutting measures across three sites.

The front of the car, and those in it, took the brunt of the impact.

bore sb silly

bore/scare etc the pants off sb

He wasn't interested in the heavy political stuff which bored the pants off most people.

It took ten minutes to reach Honey Cottage, with Yanto trying his best to scare the pants off Mary.

Lovely people who scared the pants off him.

The tests scare the pants off many managers.

Though, mind you, it scares the pants off poor old Crumwallis.

bring sth to bear (on/upon sth)

Campaigning can bring political influences to bear on the students that might affect them detrimentally. 3.

Employers brought maximum pressure to bear on workers in order to restore order: recalcitrant strikers faced lock-outs.

He brought undue pressure to bear on his parents by giving them an entirely misleading account of the documents.

He could not bring his mind to bear on the distant world her handwriting suggested.

He resisted the pain, tried to bring the weapon to bear.

Mummy and I will bring our guns to bear.

Short of a hostile military intervention in Kosovo, there are other ways of bringing outside power to bear.

Workers have their own organisations which can bring pressure to bear on governments and make demands on the state.

crashing bore

At worst, a crashing bore.

grin and bear it

Abu Salim decided that a third day wasn't necessary so I had to grin and bear it.

After debate the team concluded that they had to grin and bear it rather than descend into paranoia.

And up to now, you've had to quit or grin and bear it.

But she was not on the tour, so I had to grin and bear it.

It's not exactly affectionate, but we Limeys can grin and bear it.

There was no alternative but to grin and bear it.

We just have to grin and bear it.

sth doesn't bear repeating

water-borne/sea-borne/air-borne etc

EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES

The federal estate tax form is a real bear to fill out.

Visitors to the park are warned not to feed the bears.

EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS

After three weeks out in the field Skipper looked like an overgrown teddy bear .

Also pictured with funnyman Les is Barnardos' best-known bear and official mascot, Barnaby.

Barnett replied drily that Davis's best option was to feed the gingerbread to his bears.

Buy teddy bear wrapping paper for decorations.

Giraffes and upstanding bears are more popular than snakes, rats and spiders.

With few bears and wolves about these days, elk rule their forest habitat.

Zeus got after her one morning in the guise of a brown bear .

Longman DOCE5 Extras English vocabulary.      Дополнительный английский словарь Longman DOCE5.