Meaning of LOCK in English

LOCK

[lock] n [ME lok, fr. OE locc; akin to OHG loc lock, Gk lygos withe, L luxus dislocated] (bef. 12c) 1 a: a tuft, tress, or ringlet of hair b pl: the hair of the head

2: a cohering bunch (as of wool, cotton, or flax): tuft

[2]lock n [ME lok, fr. OE loc; akin to OHG loh enclosure and perh. to OE locc lock of hair] (bef. 12c) 1 a: a fastening (as for a door) operated by a key or a combination b: the mechanism for exploding the charge or cartridge of a firearm

2. a: an enclosure (as in a canal) with gates at each end used in raising or lowering boats as they pass from level to level b: air lock 3 a: a locking or fastening together b: an intricate mass of objects impeding each other (as in a traffic jam) c: a hold in wrestling secured on one part of the body; broadly: a controlling hold "his paper ... had a ~ on a large part of the state --John Corry"

4: one that is assured of success or favorable outcome [3]lock vt (14c) 1 a: to fasten the lock of b: to make fast with or as if with a lock "~ up the house"

2. a: to fasten in or out or to make secure or inaccessible by or as if by means of locks "~ed himself away from the curious world" "~ed her husband out" b: to fix in a particular situation or method of operation "a team firmly ~ed in last place" 3 a: to make fast, motionless, or inflexible esp. by the interlacing or interlocking of parts "~ wheels" "~ a knee" b: to hold in a close embrace c: to grapple in combat; also: to bind closely "administration and students were ~ed in conflict"

4: to invest (capital) without assurance of easy convertibility into money

5: to move or permit to pass (as a ship) by raising or lowering in a lock ~ vi 1 a: to become locked b: to be capable of being locked

2: interlace, interlock

3: to go or pass by means of a lock (as in a canal) -- lock.able adj -- lock horns : to come into conflict -- lock on also lock onto : to sight and follow (a target) automatically using a sensor (as radar)

Merriam-Webster English vocab.      Английский словарь Merriam Webster.