Meaning of STATION in English

STATION

/ ˈsteɪʃn; NAmE / noun , verb

■ noun

FOR TRAINS / BUSES

1.

a place where trains stop so that passengers can get on and off; the buildings connected with this :

I get off at the next station

the main station

Penn Station

( BrE )

a railway / train station

( especially NAmE )

a train station

( BrE )

a tube / an underground station

( NAmE )

a subway station

2.

(usually in compounds) a place where buses stop; the buildings connected with this :

a bus / coach station

HELP NOTE : In Britain, the word station on its own usually refers to the train station:

Can you tell me the way to the station?

In the US it is usual to say which station you are talking about:

the train station

the Greyhound Bus station

FOR WORK / SERVICE

3.

(usually in compounds) a place or building where a service is organized and provided or a special type of work is done :

a police station

( BrE )

a petrol station

( NAmE )

a gas station

an agricultural research station

a pollution monitoring station

—compare space station

RADIO / TV COMPANY

4.

(often in compounds) a radio or television company and the programmes it broadcasts :

a local radio / TV station

He tuned to another station.

SOCIAL POSITION

5.

( old-fashioned or formal ) your social position :

She was definitely getting ideas above her station .

POSITION

6.

a place where sb has to wait and watch or be ready to do work if needed :

You are not to leave your station without permission.

—see also docking station

LARGE FARM

7.

(usually in compounds) a large sheep or cattle farm in Australia or New Zealand

FOR ARMY / NAVY

8.

a small base for the army or navy; the people living in it :

a naval station

—see also action stations

IDIOMS

see panic noun

■ verb

[ vn + adv. / prep. ]

ARMED FORCES

1.

[ often passive ] to send sb, especially from one of the armed forces, to work in a place for a period of time :

troops stationed abroad

GO TO POSITION

2.

station sb / yourself ... ( formal ) to go somewhere and stand or sit there, especially to wait for sth; to send sb somewhere to do this :

She stationed herself at the window to await his return.

••

WORD ORIGIN

Middle English (as a noun): via Old French from Latin statio(n-) , from stare to stand. Early use referred generally to “position”, especially position in life, status , and specifically, in ecclesiastical use, to a holy place of pilgrimage (visited as one of a group) . The verb dates from the late 16th cent.

Oxford Advanced Learner's English Dictionary.      Оксфордский английский словарь для изучающик язык на продвинутом уровне.