Meaning of BAND THEORY in English

BAND THEORY

in solid-state physics, theoretical model describing the states of electrons, in solid materials, that can have values of energy only within certain specific ranges. The behaviour of an electron in a solid (and hence its energy) is related to the behaviour of all other particles around it. This is in direct contrast to the behaviour of an electron in free space where it may have any specified energy. The ranges of allowed energies of electrons in a solid are called allowed bands. Certain ranges of energies between two such allowed bands are called forbidden bandsi.e., electrons within the solid may not possess these energies. The band theory accounts for many of the electrical and thermal properties of solids and forms the basis of the technology of such devices as transistors, heating elements, and capacitors. The band of energies permitted in a solid is related to the discrete allowed energiesthe energy levelsof single, isolated atoms. When the atoms are brought together to form a solid, these discrete energy levels become perturbed interactions termed quantum mechanical effects, and the many electrons in the collection of individual atoms occupy a band of levels in the solid called the valence band. Empty states in each single atom also broaden into a band of levels that is normally empty, called the conduction band. Just as electrons at one energy level in an individual atom may transfer to another empty energy level, so electrons in the solid may transfer from one energy level in a given band to another in the same band or in another band, often crossing an intervening gap of forbidden energies. Studies of such changes of energy in solids interacting with photons of light, energetic electrons, X-rays, and the like confirm the general validity of the band theory and provide detailed information about allowed and forbidden energies. A variety of ranges of allowed and forbidden bands are found in pure elements, alloys, and compounds. Three distinct groups are usually described: metals, insulators, and semiconductors. In metals, forbidden bands do not occur in the energy range of the most energetic (outermost) electrons. Accordingly, metals are good conductors. Insulators have wide forbidden energy gaps that can be crossed only by an electron having an energy of several electron volts. Because electrons cannot move freely in the presence of an applied voltage, insulators are poor conductors. Semiconductors have relatively narrow forbidden gapswhich can be crossed by an electron having an energy of roughly one electron voltand so are intermediate conductors.

Britannica English vocabulary.      Английский словарь Британика.