Meaning of ALMOST in English

ALMOST

INDEX:

1. almost a number, time, or amount

2. almost all

3. when something is almost true

4. when you have almost done something or something has almost happened

5. when something almost happens but does not

RELATED WORDS

see also

↑ MOST

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1. almost a number, time, or amount

▷ almost/nearly /ˈɔːlməʊst, ˈnɪəʳli/ [adverb]

use this to say that something is a little less than a number or amount, or a little before a particular time. Almost and nearly have the same meaning, but almost is much more common than nearly in American English. In British English both words are common :

▪ I’ve been a teacher for nearly 10 years now.

▪ We had money and almost $1000 in traveler’s checks.

▪ John is three years old and Sally is almost six.

very nearly

▪ It’s very nearly time to go home.

▷ not quite /nɒt ˈkwaɪt/ [adverb]

use this when you want to emphasize that something is a little less than a number or amount, or a little before a particular time :

▪ ‘Is he 60?’ ‘Not quite!’

▪ It’s not quite time to go yet.

▷ close to also close on British /ˈkləʊs tuː, ˈkləʊs ɒn/ [adverb]

almost a particular number, amount, especially a surprisingly large one, or almost a particular time, especially a very late time :

▪ The government spends close to $100 billion a year on education.

▪ There must be close to a hundred people in the hall.

▪ We drove close on 500 miles Saturday.

▪ It was close on midnight by the time they got home.

▷ approaching/nearing /əˈprəʊtʃɪŋ, ˈnɪ ə rɪŋ/ [adverb]

almost a particular number, amount, time etc, and still increasing or getting nearer to that number, amount, time etc :

▪ In the North East, the unemployment rate is now nearing 20 percent.

be fast approaching

very nearly a particular time

▪ By now the winter was fast approaching, and further travel would soon be inadvisable.

▷ getting on for /ˌgetɪŋ ˈɒn fɔːʳ/ British informal

to be almost a particular time, age, or period of time :

it’s getting on for something

▪ It’s getting on for 10 years since we last saw each other.

▪ It must be getting on for lunch time. I’m starving.

somebody is getting on for 40, 50 etc

use this when guessing an older person’s age

▪ ‘How old’s Diane?’ ‘She must be getting on for 50.’

▷ be pushing 40/50 etc /biː ˌpʊʃɪŋ ˈfɔːʳti/ [verb phrase] informal

to be almost forty, fifty etc - use this when you are guessing an older person’s age :

▪ Burt’s probably pushing 50 by now.

2. almost all

▷ almost/nearly /ˈɔːlməʊst, ˈnɪəʳli/ [adverb]

almost all/every/everything/everyone

▪ Almost all the wine had been drunk.

▪ The burglars took nearly everything in the house that was of any value.

▪ Almost everyone in the office has had the flu this year.

▷ practically/virtually /ˈpræktɪkli, ˈvɜːʳtʃuəli/ [adverb]

practically all/everything/everyone etc

very nearly all :

▪ The frost killed practically every plant in the garden.

▪ Virtually everyone had gone home.

▷ just about/more or less/pretty much /ˌdʒʌst əˈbaʊt, ˌmɔːr əʳ ˈles, ˈprɪti mʌtʃ/ [adverb] especially spoken

just about all/everything/everyone etc

very nearly all - use this when saying that the difference is not important :

▪ I’ve packed pretty much everything I need for the trip.

▪ It rains more or less every day here in November.

▪ Sonya knew more or less everyone at the party.

▪ She’s travelled in just about every country in Europe.

▪ The second-hand shop on the corner sells just about anything.

3. when something is almost true

▷ almost/nearly /ˈɔːlməʊst, ˈnɪəʳli/:

▪ His hair was almost white.

▪ The moon was almost full that night.

▪ Persuading Paul to change his mind is nearly impossible.

▷ not quite /nɒt ˈkwaɪt/ [adverb]

not completely, but almost - use this to say that something is not true, but it is almost true :

▪ That’s a good answer but it’s not quite correct.

▪ It’s not quite red, it’s more like a maroon color.

▪ The orbits of the planets are almost circular, but not quite.

▷ practically/virtually /ˈpræktɪkli, ˈvɜːʳtʃuəli/ [adverb]

very nearly :

▪ The cupboard was practically empty.

▪ Carbon fibre tennis racquets are virtually unbreakable.

▪ She looks practically the same as his last girlfriend.

▷ more or less/just about/pretty much /ˌmɔːr əʳ ˈles, ˌdʒʌst əˈbaʊt, ˈprɪti mʌtʃ/ [adverb] especially spoken

very nearly - use this when saying that the difference is not important :

▪ All the rooms are more or less the same size.

▪ His jacket was pretty much the same colour as his trousers.

▪ Until the 18th century, the region remained more or less independent.

▷ be close /biː ˈkləʊs/ [verb phrase]

if a guess at a number, amount etc is close, it is almost correct but not exactly right :

▪ ‘I reckon he’s about 65.’ ‘You’re close - he’s 67.’

4. when you have almost done something or something has almost happened

▷ almost/nearly /ˈɔːlməʊst, ˈnɪəʳli/ [adverb]

▪ I’ve almost finished reading the newspaper.

▪ It was early 1945, and the war had nearly ended.

▷ just about/more or less/pretty much /ˌdʒʌst əˈbaʊt, ˌmɔːr əʳ ˈles, ˈprɪti mʌtʃ/ [adverb] especially spoken

not completely or exactly, but almost - use this when the difference is not important :

▪ Hanson’s acting career appears to be pretty much over.

▪ I had more or less convinced her that I was telling the truth.

▷ practically/virtually /ˈpræktɪkli, ˈvɜːʳtʃuəli/ [adverb]

almost completely :

▪ Communist parties have practically disappeared in Europe.

▪ Mexico’s rainforest has been virtually destroyed.

▷ not quite /nɒt ˈkwaɪt/ [adverb]

not completely, but almost - use this to say that something has not happened, but that it almost has :

not quite done/finished etc

▪ She hasn’t quite finished her homework yet.

▪ Give me five minutes - I’m not quite ready.

▷ all but /ˈɔːl bət/ [adverb]

all but over/finished/done

very nearly finished or done :

▪ By now the war was all but over.

▪ ‘Can we go home now?’ ‘Just one moment - I’ve all but finished my work.’

▷ nearing/approaching/close to /ˈnɪ ə rɪŋ, əˈprəʊtʃɪŋ, ˈkləʊs tuː/ [adverb]

almost at or in a particular situation, especially an extreme one :

▪ The police describe the situation as approaching crisis proportions.

▪ Dr Dunstable was in a state nearing nervous collapse.

▪ I felt close to tears as I read Vera’s letter.

▷ be on the verge/brink of /biː ɒn ðə ˈvɜːʳdʒ, ˈbrɪŋk ɒv/ [verb phrase]

to be very close to an extremely bad situation :

▪ The two countries are on the brink of war.

be on the verge of tears/death/hysteria etc

▪ Kerry is on the verge of a nervous breakdown.

5. when something almost happens but does not

▷ almost/nearly /ˈɔːlməʊst, ˈnɪəʳli/ [adverb]

▪ I was laughing so hard I almost fell out of my chair.

▪ The terrorists almost succeeded in blowing up the President’s limousine.

very nearly

▪ She was very lucky. She very nearly lost her life.

▷ come close to/come near to /kʌm ˈkləʊs tuː, kʌm ˈnɪəʳ tuː/ [verb phrase]

to almost do something or almost be in a particular state :

come close/near to doing something

▪ She was so angry that she came very close to walking out of the meeting.

▪ Dad came near to changing his mind about lending me the car.

be close/near to something

▪ The negotiations were very near to breaking down.

▷ come within an inch/inches of /ˌkʌm wɪðɪn ən ˈɪntʃ, ˈɪntʃə̇z ɒv/ [verb phrase]

to very nearly do something, especially something dangerous or unpleasant :

come within inches of death

▪ Coulson came within inches of death on a climbing trip in the Himalayas last year.

come within an inch of doing something

▪ Manchester United came within an inch of losing the game.

▷ narrowly /ˈnærəʊli/ [adverb]

narrowly avoid/miss/escape etc

to avoid something unpleasant or dangerous, although you almost do not avoid it :

▪ Flying into the airport at Lima, we narrowly avoided a collision with another plane.

▪ The article says Meyers narrowly escaped arrest in Rome last month.

narrow [adjective only before noun]

▪ A woman and child had a very narrow escape they were almost killed when their car hit a tree near Hartford last night.

▷ close shave /ˌkləʊs ˈʃeɪv/ [countable noun]

a situation in which someone is almost killed or injured :

▪ Mike’s had two motorcycle accidents, plus a few other pretty close shaves.

▷ be a near thing/close thing /biː ə ˌnɪəʳ ˈθɪŋ, ˌkləʊs ˈθɪŋ/ [verb phrase] British

if something that you succeed in doing is a near thing or a close thing you succeed in doing it, but only at the last moment :

▪ The Labour party won the election, but it was a very near thing.

▪ Security forces managed to free the hostages, but it was a very close thing.

▷ that was close /ˌðæt wəz ˈkləʊs/ spoken

say this when something bad very nearly happens but does not, especially when this is the result of good luck :

▪ The guard began to search the pile of leaves where we were hiding, but then got distracted by a noise from the house. ‘Phew, that was close!’ said John. ‘C’mon, let’s get out of here!’

Longman Activator English vocab.      Английский словарь Longman активатор .