Meaning of SLIDE in English

SLIDE

I. ˈslīd verb

( slid ˈslid ; or dialect slod ˈsläd ; or archaic slided ; slid or archaic slidden ˈslid ə n ; sliding ; slides )

Etymology: Middle English sliden, from Old English slīdan to glide, slip, backslide; akin to Middle High German slīten to slide, Greek olisthanein to slip, glide, fall, Sanskrit sredhati he errs, blunders, Greek leios smooth — more at lime

intransitive verb

1.

a. : to go with a smooth continuous motion : glide

fishes … sliding swiftly from your boat — American Guide Series: Florida

a little red convertible slid up the … driveway — S.A.Offit

shadows slid along the huge wooden tables — Sinclair Lewis

b. : to coast over a surface (as snow or ice) by means of gravity or momentum

a startled dog slides toward the skaters on all four feet

slide downhill on a toboggan

when the glacier slid down across New England — L.K.Porritt

c. : to drop down and approach a base in baseball along the ground usually feet first with the weight of the body carried on one hip

slid safely into third base ahead of the catcher's throw

2.

a.

(1) : to suffer a moral relapse : backslide

lead me in all thy righteous ways, nor suffer me to slide — Charles Wesley

(2) : to take a downward turn

if the readjustment … slides into a recession — Fortune

b. : to slip or fall by loss of footing

stumbled over a log and slid down the slope

c. : to change position or become dislocated : shift , slip

the packages slide from her arms

rain slid off the smooth hide of the mountains — G.T.Nunn

3. : to become dissipated : vanish

it was inevitable that existentialism should slide out of men's minds — Norman Cousins

4.

a. : to slither along the ground : crawl , wriggle

began their advance, one sliding forward on his stomach — Georg Meyers

b. : to stream along : flow , pour

walked … along the dark sliding river — Irwin Shaw

5.

a. : to pass effortlessly or unobserved : drift — used of time

how happily must my old age slide away — Henry Fielding

b. : to become readily transferred or diverted

his eye slides from the printed page to the wonderful world outdoors

c. : to take a natural course

finds it easier to let things slide than to insist on strict observance of the rules

d. : to get along with a minimum of effort

this means doing your best, not just sliding through — Boy Scout Handbk.

6.

a. : to move softly or unobtrusively : disappear surreptitiously : sneak , steal

slid behind the bole of a fir tree — F.V.W.Mason

after playing to empty benches for two nights, they slid out of town — American Guide Series: Washington

b. : to pass easily or gradually

slide into a reverie — John Masters

c. : to become gradually transformed

may not godly authority imperceptibly slide over into plain tyranny — V.L.Parrington

d. : to pass by gradations from one pitch to another without cessation of sound

sliding … is another undesirable feature of singing — Sergius Kagen

transitive verb

1.

a. : to cause to glide or slip

slid the car to the curb — Erle Stanley Gardner

slide the left ski forward, then the right

b. : to traverse in a sliding manner

firemen slide the poles to the street floor

2. : to put or introduce surreptitiously

slid the gun out of sight under his coat — Raymond Chandler

the danger of … getting an emperor or a king or a dictator slid over on them — Dorothy C. Fisher

3. : to place (as an alphabetic sequence) beside another sequence in various juxtapositions at each of which the letters of one correspond one-to-one to those of the other

II. noun

( -s )

1.

a. : an act or instance of sliding: as

(1) : a transit over a slippery surface

a skier's hunger for more slides … per weekend — William Gilman

(2) : chassé

(3) : the distance the fork moves after drop lock in a lever-escapement watch to reach the banking pin

(4) : a sliding approach to a base in baseball — compare hook slide

b.

(1) archaic : a smooth progression

verses, that have a slide , and easiness — Francis Bacon

(2) : a lapse in morals or fortunes

if he should … discover a bit of backward slide in himself — H.A.Overstreet

(3) : a downward turn

action to halt the economic slide — S.H.Slichter

c.

(1) : a musical grace consisting of two or more small notes moving by adjacent degrees and leading to a principal note either above or below

(2) : portamento

2. : a sliding part or mechanism: as

a. : any of various clothing ornaments that slide on and hold by gripping

tie slide

belt slide

b.

(1) : a U-shaped section of tube in the trombone that is pushed out and in to produce the tones between the fundamental and its harmonics

(2) : a short tube that is used in most metal wind instruments to adjust the pitch

c.

(1) : a moving piece (as the ram of a punch press) that is guided by a part along which it slides

slide valve

(2) : a guiding surface (as a feeding mechanism) along which something slides — compare cross slide

d. : sliding seat

e. : a small runner to which something is attached to guide it along a track

the luff of the sail … is sewn on to slides which run in a metal track along the after side of the mast — F.E.Dodman

f.

(1) : the knee of a composing stick

(2) : a slugcasting-machine matrix for casting rules or borders

g. : a cryptographical device resembling a slide rule with a fixed member usually carrying one alphabetic sequence and a double-length sliding member another one repeated

3.

a.

(1) : the descent of a mass (as of earth, rock, or snow) down a hill or mountainside

a slide of rock

— used chiefly in combination

land slide

snow slide

(2) : the track left by a slide

(3) : a mass of debris deposited by a slide

b. : a dislocation in which one rock mass in a mining lode has slid on another : fault

4. : a drag or sledge for transporting heavy loads over a relatively smooth surface

cut the last of the crop and … hauled it on a slide to the tobacco barn — Elizabeth M. Roberts

— called also slider

5.

a.

(1) : a slippery surface for coasting or sliding

ski slide

toboggan slide

(2) : a chute with a flat polished bed sloping down from the top of a mounting ladder

playground slide

gave him a slide for his swimming pool — British Books of the Month

b. : a channel or track on which something is slid

pushed the heavy door on the slide and … followed him into the barn — Astrid Peters

c. : a sloping trough down which objects are carried by gravity

log slide

d. : an inclined plane on moist soil adjoining water and smoothed by otters or occasionally other aquatic mammals at play

e. or slide stacker : an inclined plane up which hay is drawn for stacking

6.

a. : a usually rectangular piece of glass on which an object is mounted for microscopic examination

b.

(1) : a photographic transparency on a small plate or film suitably protected for projection — see filmslide , lantern slide

(2) : dark slide

7. : scuff 4

Webster's New International English Dictionary.      Новый международный словарь английского языка Webster.