Meaning of TOOTH in English

TOOTH

(teeth)

Frequency: The word is one of the 3000 most common words in English.

1.

Your teeth are the hard white objects in your mouth, which you use for biting and chewing.

If a ~ feels very loose, your dentist may recommend that it’s taken out.

N-COUNT: oft poss N

2.

The teeth of something such as a comb, saw, cog, or zip are the parts that stick out in a row on its edge.

N-PLURAL

3.

If you say that something such as an official group or a law has teeth, you mean that it has power and is able to be effective.

The opposition argues that the new council will be unconstitutional and without teeth...

The law must have teeth, and it must be enforced.

N-PLURAL

4.

see also wisdom ~

5.

If you say that someone cut their teeth doing a particular thing, at a particular time, or in a particular place, you mean that that is how, when, or where they began their career and learned some of their skills.

...director John Glen, who cut his teeth on Bond movies...

PHRASE: V inflects, PHR prep, PHR -ing

6.

If you say that something sets your teeth on edge, you mean that you find it extremely unpleasant or irritating.

Their voices set your teeth on edge.

PHRASE: V inflects

7.

If you fight ~ and nail to do something, you do everything you can in order to achieve it. If you fight something ~ and nail, you do everything you can in order to prevent it.

He fought ~ and nail to keep his job...

PHRASE: V inflects, oft PHR to-inf

8.

If you describe a task or activity as something you can get your teeth into, you mean that you like it because it is interesting, complex, and makes you think hard. (INFORMAL)

This role gave her something to get her teeth into...

PHRASE: V inflects, oft PHR n approval

9.

If you do something in the teeth of a difficulty or danger, you do it in spite of the difficulty or danger.

I was battling my way along the promenade in the teeth of a force ten gale...

In the teeth of the longest recession since the 1930s, the company continues to perform well.

PHRASE: PHR n

10.

If you say that someone is lying through their teeth, you are emphasizing that they are telling lies. (INFORMAL)

PHRASE: V inflects emphasis

11.

If you describe someone as long in the ~, you are saying unkindly or humorously that they are old or getting old. (INFORMAL)

Aren’t I a bit long in the ~ to start being an undergraduate?

PHRASE: v-link PHR disapproval

12.

If you have a sweet ~, you like sweet food very much.

PHRASE: usu PHR after v

13.

to get the bit between your teeth: see bit

to give one’s eye teeth for something : see eye

to gnash one’s teeth: see gnash

to grit your teeth: see grit

a kick in the teeth: see kick

by the skin of your teeth: see skin

Collins COBUILD.      Толковый словарь английского языка для изучающих язык Коллинз COBUILD (международная база данных языков Бирмингемского университета) .