Meaning of DRIVE in English

DRIVE

/ draɪv; NAmE / verb , noun

■ verb

( drove / drəʊv; NAmE droʊv/, driven / ˈdrɪvn; NAmE /)

VEHICLE

1.

to operate a vehicle so that it goes in a particular direction :

[ v ]

Can you drive?

Don't drive so fast!

I drove to work this morning.

Shall we drive (= go there by car) or go by train?

[ vn ]

He drives a taxi (= that is his job) .

2.

[ vn , usually + adv. / prep. ] to take sb somewhere in a car, taxi, etc. :

Could you drive me home?

➡ note at take

3.

[ vn ] to own or use a particular type of vehicle :

What car do you drive?

MACHINE

4.

[ vn ] [ usually passive ] to provide the power that makes a machine work :

a steam-driven locomotive

MAKE SB DO STH

5.

[ vn ] to force sb to act in a particular way :

The urge to survive drove them on.

You're driving yourself too hard.

6.

to make sb very angry, crazy, etc. or to make them do sth extreme :

[ vn - adj ]

to drive sb crazy / mad / insane

[ vn to inf ]

Hunger drove her to steal.

[ vn ]

Those kids are driving me to despair.

( humorous )

It's enough to drive you to drink (= to make you start drinking too much alcohol) .

MAKE SB / STH MOVE

7.

[ vn + adv. / prep. ] to force sb/sth to move in a particular direction :

to drive sheep into a field

The enemy was driven back.

CAUSE STH TO MAKE PROGRESS

8.

[ vn ] to influence sth or cause it to make progress :

This is the main factor driving investment in the area.

HIT / PUSH

9.

[ vn + adv. / prep. ] to force sth to go in a particular direction or into a particular position by pushing it, hitting it, etc. :

to drive a nail into a piece of wood

MAKE A HOLE

10.

[ vn + adv. / prep. ] to make an opening in or through sth by using force :

They drove a tunnel through the solid rock.

IN SPORT

11.

to hit a ball with force, sending it forward :

[ vn ]

to drive the ball into the rough (= in golf )

[also v ]

WIND / WATER

12.

[ vn , usually + adv. / prep. ] to carry sth along :

Huge waves drove the yacht onto the rocks.

13.

[ v , usually + adv. / prep. ] to fall or move rapidly and with great force :

The waves drove against the shore.

IDIOMS

- drive a coach and horses through sth

- drive sth home (to sb)

- what sb is driving at

—more at ground noun , hard adjective , snow noun

PHRASAL VERBS

- drive away | drive sb/sth away

- drive sb away

- drive off

- drive sb/sth off

- drive on

- drive sb/sth out (of sth)

- drive sth up / down

■ noun

IN / OF VEHICLE

1.

[ C ] a journey in a car or other vehicle :

Let's go for a drive .

It's a three-hour drive to London.

2.

[ C , U ] the equipment in a vehicle that takes power from the engine to the wheels :

the drive shaft

a car with four-wheel drive

a left- / right-hand drive car (= a car where the driver and the controls are on the left / right)

OUTSIDE HOUSE

3.

(also drive·way ) [ C ] a wide hard path or a private road that leads from the street to a house :

There were two cars parked in / on the drive.

—picture at detached

EFFORT

4.

[ C ] drive (for sth) | drive (to do sth) an organized effort by a group of people to achieve sth :

a recruitment / export / economy drive

a drive for greater efficiency

the government's drive to reduce energy consumption

➡ note at drive

DESIRE / ENERGY

5.

[ C , U ] a strong desire or need in people :

a strong sexual drive

6.

[ U ] ( approving ) a strong desire to do things and achieve sth; great energy :

He'll do very well—he has tremendous drive.

IN SPORT

7.

[ C ] a long hard hit or kick :

She has a strong forehand drive (= in tennis ) .

He scored with a brilliant 25-yard drive.

COMPUTING

8.

[ C ] the part of a computer that reads and stores information on disks or tapes :

a 40GB hard drive

a CD drive

—see also disk drive

GAMES

9.

[ C ] ( BrE ) a social occasion when a lot of people compete in a game such as whist or bingo

ANIMALS / ENEMY

10.

[ C ] an act of chasing animals or the enemy and making them go into a smaller area, especially in order to kill or capture them

ROAD

11.

Drive ( abbr. Dr ) used in the names of roads :

21 Island Heights Drive

••

WORD ORIGIN

Old English drīfan urge (a person or animal) to go forward , of Germanic origin; related to Dutch drijven and German treiben .

Oxford Advanced Learner's English Dictionary.      Оксфордский английский словарь для изучающик язык на продвинутом уровне.