Meaning of THIN in English

THIN

INDEX:

thin person

1. thin

2. thin in an attractive way

3. thin and strong-looking

4. thin in a way that is not attractive

5. too thin in a way that is unhealthy

6. having a thin face because you are very worried, tired etc

7. to become thinner

thin object or material

8. flat and thin

9. long and thin

10. words for describing thin material

11. to become thinner

RELATED WORDS

opposite

↑ FAT

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1. thin

▷ thin /θɪn/ [adjective]

having very little fat on the body :

▪ Larry was tall and thin with dark brown hair and bright blue eyes.

▪ She looked pale, thin, and unhealthy.

▪ I wish my legs were thinner.

▷ slight /slaɪt/ [adjective]

thin, delicate, often weak-looking, and usually not very tall :

▪ Yoshida is a slight, quiet man with a grey beard.

▪ a small, slight child with delicate-looking features

2. thin in an attractive way

▷ slim /slɪm/ [adjective]

▪ She was tall, slim, blond, and really good-looking.

▪ Mrs Ester was in her late thirties, about average height, with a slim figure.

▪ You’re looking slimmer - have you lost weight?

stay slim

:

▪ She looks great -- how does she stay so slim?

▷ slender /ˈslendəʳ/ [adjective]

thin in an attractive and graceful way :

▪ Gabriel was a tall slender young man with a light brown moustache.

▪ Mandy was slender and very fair with long golden hair.

▪ She had long, slender expressive hands, like a concert pianist.

▷ willowy /ˈwɪləʊi/ [adjective]

a woman or girl who is willowy is attractively tall and thin in a graceful way -- used especially in romantic novels :

▪ In contrast to Francesca, who was tall and willowy, Diana was small and curvy.

▪ Anastasia was willowy and graceful, with grey eyes and long, straight red hair.

3. thin and strong-looking

▷ lean /liːn/ [adjective]

thin and physically fit, especially because you do a lot of exercise or physical work :

▪ He’s a very handsome man: tall, lean and tanned with thick blond hair.

▪ At seventy-two my grandfather was lean and strong and I expected him to live forever.

▪ She had a runner’s lean physique and an overall healthy glow.

▷ wiry /ˈwaɪ ə ri/ [adjective]

a man or boy who is wiry is thin and strong, though often not very tall :

▪ Father Vic was a wiry man in his late forties with a sharp nose and deep-set eyes.

▪ a wiry little Broadway show dancer from Puerto Rico

4. thin in a way that is not attractive

▷ skinny /ˈskɪni/ [adjective]

▪ a skinny kid with glasses

▪ I was really skinny when I was a teenager.

▪ Jacob placed his arm around her skinny shoulders.

▷ bony /ˈbəʊni/ [adjective]

a person or animal that is bony is extremely thin, so that the shape of their bones can be seen :

▪ Now that she was older, Jean’s bony fingers and wrists were too small for her jewelry.

▪ When I picked up the cat it felt as bony as a skeleton.

▪ Kinsit, a naturally small woman with a thin, bony face, found gaining weight difficult.

▷ scrawny /ˈskrɔːni/ [adjective]

small, thin, unattractive, and weak-looking, especially because your body has not grown enough :

▪ Last time I saw him he was a scrawny kid in Levi’s and a dirty T-shirt.

▪ A few scrawny chickens were searching for scraps of food in the dry earth.

5. too thin in a way that is unhealthy

▷ emaciated /ɪˈmeɪʃieɪtɪd, ɪˈmeɪʃieɪtəd/ [adjective]

someone who is emaciated is extremely thin because of hunger or serious illness and may die soon :

▪ News came of the famine, and there were pictures of emaciated children on the TV.

▪ Towards the end of his life he looked emaciated, his cheeks hollow and his eyes sunken.

▷ be skin and bone /biː ˌskɪn ən ˈbəʊn/ [verb phrase] informal

to be extremely thin in an unattractive and unhealthy way :

be nothing but/no more than skin and bone

▪ When she died she was nothing but skin and bone.

be just/practically skin and bone

▪ The poor dog was practically skin and bone.

▷ underweight /ˌʌndəʳˈweɪt◂/ [adjective]

someone who is underweight weighs less than they should and is therefore unhealthy -- used especially in a medical context :

▪ The doctor says that I’m underweight and has put me on a special diet.

▪ Women who consume large amounts of caffeine are more likely to give birth to underweight babies.

6. having a thin face because you are very worried, tired etc

▷ drawn /drɔːn/ [adjective]

thin and unhappy-looking because of tiredness, illness, or worry :

▪ Her face was pale and drawn, and she seemed to have been crying.

▪ When Jack arrived he sat down slowly, his face drawn, with beads of sweat on his forehead.

look drawn

have a drawn expression on your face

▪ The doctor came out, looking drawn and exhausted.

▷ gaunt /gɔːnt/ [adjective]

extremely thin and pale, especially because you have been very ill or worried or because you have been working too hard :

▪ When I visited him in hospital Albert looked terrible -- his face was gaunt and his hair had turned grey.

▪ The District Attorney at forty-four had the gaunt look of a man twenty years older.

7. to become thinner

▷ lose weight /ˌluːz ˈweɪt/ [verb phrase]

to become thinner, either because you have been ill or because you want to look more attractive, be healthier etc :

▪ The best way to lose weight is to eat less and do lots of exercise.

▪ I’m really worried about my grandmother -- she’s lost a lot of weight recently.

lose three kilos/five pounds etc

▪ Alec lost seven pounds in a week and had to be re-admitted to the hospital.

▷ be on a diet /biː ɒn ə ˈdaɪət/ [verb phrase]

to eat less food than usual, or to eat only certain foods, because you want to become thinner and weigh less :

▪ ‘Would you like some chocolate?’ ‘No thanks, I’m on a diet.’

go on a diet

start to be on a diet

▪ We’re both going on a diet after Christmas.

▷ slim down /ˌslɪm ˈdaʊn/ [intransitive verb] especially British

to become thinner, especially by eating less and doing more exercise :

▪ She’s really slimmed down a lot since I last saw her.

slim down to eight stone/100 pounds etc

▪ He’s trying to slim down to eleven stone.

▷ shed /ʃed/ [transitive verb]

to lose a particular amount of weight quickly :

▪ I’d like to shed a few pounds.

▪ Stone’s doctor ordered him to shed some weight and quit smoking.

▪ Gascoigne has shed nearly 6 kilos in pre-season training and looks much fitter.

▷ waste away /ˌweɪst əˈweɪ/ [intransitive phrasal verb]

to become dangerously thin and weak, usually as a result of illness :

▪ There was nothing we could do -- she just wasted away and within six weeks she was dead.

▪ His muscles were slowly wasting away because of his illness.

8. flat and thin

▷ thin /θɪn/ [adjective]

▪ a thin slice of bread

▪ In her pocket was a thin leather wallet containing six ten dollar bills.

▪ The lake was covered with a thin layer of ice.

▪ How do you get your sugar cookies so thin, Dagmar?

▷ paper-thin /ˌpeɪpəʳ ˈθɪn◂/ [adjective]

extremely thin - use this about thin pieces of food or about walls that are very thin :

▪ paper-thin slices of raw beef

▪ The walls in this apartment are paper-thin; I can hear everything they’re saying next door.

▷ slim /slɪm/ [adjective]

a book, box etc that is slim is thin in an attractive way and usually of good quality :

▪ Claude gave me a slim gold box for holding my business cards.

▪ a slim volume of poetry

9. long and thin

▷ thin /θɪn/ [adjective]

▪ The roof is supported by thin iron columns.

▪ a thin blue line

▪ a wire as thin as a human hair

▷ slender /ˈslendəʳ/ [adjective]

a stem, stick etc that is slender is long and thin in a graceful, attractive way :

▪ The pictures are held in place by three slender brass rods.

▪ slender white candles

▪ A spider was hanging from a slender thread.

10. words for describing thin material

▷ thin /θɪn/ [adjective]

▪ Martin wore a thin cotton shirt under his sweater.

▪ It was a chilly night, and he had only a thin blanket for warmth.

▷ fine /faɪn/ [adjective]

very thin, delicate, and usually of good quality :

▪ fine china

▪ a fine chiffon veil with embroidered edges

▷ light/lightweight /laɪt, ˈlaɪtweɪt/ [adjective]

clothes that are light or lightweight are thin and not very warm :

▪ She took a light sweater, in case it was cool outside.

▪ In a warm climate people wear loose, lightweight clothing.

▪ I don’t think it’ll be that cold - do you have anything more lightweight?

▷ flimsy /ˈflɪmzi/ [adjective]

too thin and light, use this about clothes or material that you can easily see through or that do not protect your body :

▪ It was impossible for me to sleep under a single flimsy blanket on such a cold night.

▪ flimsy underwear

11. to become thinner

▷ get/grow thinner /ˌget, ˌgrəʊ ˈθɪnəʳ/ [verb phrase]

▪ Rubber gets thinner if you stretch it.

▪ The line of smoke grew thinner and thinner as it drifted up into the sky.

▷ taper /ˈteɪpəʳ/ [intransitive verb]

if something long and thin tapers, it gets gradually thinner at one end :

taper to

▪ The walls are 7 feet thick at the base and taper to 28 inches at the top.

taper off

taper and come to an end

▪ The human spine tapers off at its base.

tapering [adjective]

▪ long tapering fingers

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