Meaning of SIGHT in English

SIGHT

/ saɪt; NAmE / noun , verb

■ noun

ABILITY TO SEE

1.

[ U ] the ability to see

SYN eyesight :

to lose your sight (= to become blind)

She has very good sight.

The disease has affected her sight.

He has very little sight in his right eye.

ACT OF SEEING

2.

[ U ] sight of sb/sth the act of seeing sb/sth :

After ten days at sea, we had our first sight of land.

I have been known to faint at the sight of blood.

The soldiers were given orders to shoot on sight (= as soon as they saw sb) .

She caught sight of a car in the distance.

HOW FAR YOU CAN SEE

3.

[ U ] the area or distance within which sb can see or sth can be seen :

There was no one in sight .

At last we came in sight of a few houses.

A bicycle came into sight on the main road.

The end is in sight (= will happen soon) .

Leave any valuables in your car out of sight .

Keep out of sight (= stay where you cannot be seen) .

She never lets her daughter out of her sight (= always keeps her where she can see her) .

Get out of my sight! (= Go away!)

The boat disappeared from sight .

The house was hidden from sight behind some trees.

He had placed himself directly in my line of sight .

WHAT YOU CAN SEE

4.

[ C ] a thing that you see or can see :

It's a spectacular sight as the flamingos lift into the air.

The museum attempts to recreate the sights and sounds of wartime Britain.

He was a sorry sight , soaked to the skin and shivering.

The bird is now a rare sight in this country.

➡ note at view

INTERESTING PLACES

5.

sights [ pl. ] the interesting places, especially in a town or city, that are often visited by tourists :

We're going to Paris for the weekend to see the sights .

RIDICULOUS / UNTIDY PERSON

6.

a sight [ sing. ] ( informal , especially BrE ) a person or thing that looks ridiculous, untidy, unpleasant, etc. :

She looks a sight in that hat!

ON GUN / TELESCOPE

7.

[ C , usually pl. ] a device that you look through to aim a gun, etc. or to look at sth through a telescope , etc. :

He had the deer in his sights now.

( figurative )

Even as a young actress, she always had Hollywood firmly in her sights (= as her final goal) .

IDIOMS

- at first sight

- hate, be sick of, etc. the sight of sb/sth

- in the sight of sb / in sb's sight

- lose sight of sb/sth

- out of sight, out of mind

- raise / lower your sights

- set your sights on sth / on doing sth

- a (damn, etc.) sight better, etc. | a (damn, etc.) sight too good, etc.

- a sight for sore eyes

- sight unseen

—more at heave verb , know verb , nowhere , pretty adjective

■ verb

[ vn ] ( formal ) to suddenly see sth, especially sth you have been looking for :

After twelve days at sea, they sighted land.

••

SYNONYMS

sight

view ♦ vision

These are all words for the area or distance that you can see from a particular position.

sight

the area or distance that you can see from a particular position:

He looked up the street, but there was no one in sight.

Leave any valuables in your car out of sight.

view

( rather formal ) the area or distance that you can see from a particular position:

The lake soon came into view.

vision

the area that you can see from a particular position:

The couple moved outside her field of vision (= total area you can see from a particular position) .

sight, view or vision?

View is more literary than sight or vision . It is the only word for talking about how well you can see: I didn't have a good sight / vision of the stage. Vision must always be used with a possessive pronoun:

my / his/her etc. (field of) vision

. It is not used with the prepositions in, into and out of that are very frequent with sight and view : There was nobody in vision. • A tall figure came into vision.

PATTERNS AND COLLOCATIONS :

in / out of sight / view

in / within sight / view of sth

in full / plain sight / view

to come into / disappear from sight / view / sb's vision

to vanish from sight / view

to come in sight / view of sb/sth

to block sb's view / vision

sb's line of sight / vision

sb's field of view / vision

••

WORD ORIGIN

Old English (ge)sihth something seen , of West Germanic origin; related to Dutch zicht and German Gesicht sight, face, appearance.

Oxford Advanced Learner's English Dictionary.      Оксфордский английский словарь для изучающик язык на продвинутом уровне.