Meaning of VIEW in English

VIEW

/ vjuː; NAmE / noun , verb

■ noun

OPINION

1.

[ C ] view (about / on sth) a personal opinion about sth; an attitude towards sth :

to have different / conflicting / opposing views

to have strong political views

His views on the subject were well known.

This evidence supports the view that there is too much violence on television.

We take the view that it would be wrong to interfere.

In my view it was a waste of time.

What is needed is a frank exchange of views .

—see also point of view

WAY OF UNDERSTANDING

2.

[ sing. ] view (of sth) a way of understanding or thinking about sth :

He has an optimistic view of life.

the Christian view of the world

The traditional view was that marriage was meant to last.

—see also world view

WHAT YOU CAN SEE

3.

[ U , sing. ] used when you are talking about whether you can see sth or whether sth can be seen in a particular situation :

The lake soon came into view .

The sun disappeared from view .

There was nobody in view .

Sit down—you're blocking my view.

I didn't have a good view of the stage.

➡ note at sight

4.

[ C ] what you can see from a particular place or position, especially beautiful countryside :

There were magnificent views of the surrounding countryside.

The view from the top of the tower was spectacular.

a sea / mountain view

I'd like a room with a view.

PHOTOGRAPH / PICTURE

5.

[ C ] a photograph or picture that shows an interesting place or scene :

a book with views of Paris

CHANCE TO SEE STH

6.

(also view·ing ) [ C ] a special chance to see or admire sth :

a private view (= for example, of an art exhibition)

IDIOMS

- have, etc. sth in view

- in full view (of sb/sth)

- in view of sth

- on view

- with a view to sth / to doing sth

—more at bird , dim adjective , heave verb , long adjective

■ verb

[ vn ]

THINK ABOUT STH

1.

view sb/sth as sth | view sb/sth with sth to think about sb/sth in a particular way :

When the car was first built, the design was viewed as highly original.

How do you view your position within the company?

She viewed him with suspicion.

➡ note at regard

LOOK AT STH

2.

to look at sth, especially when you look carefully :

People came from all over the world to view her work.

A viewing platform gave stunning views over the valley.

➡ note at look

3.

to visit a house, etc. with the intention of buying or renting it :

The property can only be viewed by appointment.

WATCH TV, FILM / MOVIE

4.

( formal ) to watch television, a film / movie, etc. :

The show has a viewing audience of six million (= six million people watch it) .

an opportunity to view the movie before it goes on general release

➡ note at look

••

SYNONYMS

view

sight ♦ scene ♦ vista ♦ panorama ♦ spectacle

These are all words for a thing that you can see, especially from a particular place.

view

what you can see from a particular place or position, especially beautiful natural scenery:

The cottage had a delightful sea view.

sight

a thing that you see or can see, especially sth that is impressive or unusual:

It's a spectacular sight as the flamingos lift into the air.

scene

a view that you see, especially one with people and/or animals moving about and doing things:

It was a delightful rural scene.

vista

( literary ) a beautiful view; a long, narrow view, for example between rows of trees or buildings.

panorama

a view of a wide area of land:

The tower offers a breathtaking panorama of Prague.

spectacle

( literary ) a sight or view that is very impressive or attracts a lot of attention:

The wide plain, with thousands of animals on the move, was an awesome spectacle.

PATTERNS AND COLLOCATIONS :

a view / vista / panorama of / from...

a beautiful view / sight / scene / vista / panorama / spectacle

a spectacular view / sight / vista / panorama

a sad / sorry sight / scene / spectacle

an industrial / urban view / scene

to admire / take in the view / sight / scene / vista / panorama / spectacle

••

WORD ORIGIN

Middle English : from Anglo-Norman French vieue , feminine past participle of veoir see, from Latin videre . The verb dates from the early 16th cent.

Oxford Advanced Learner's English Dictionary.      Оксфордский английский словарь для изучающик язык на продвинутом уровне.