Meaning of HEAT in English

HEAT

/ hiːt; NAmE / noun , verb

■ noun

BEING HOT / TEMPERATURE

1.

[ U , sing. ] the quality of being hot :

He could feel the heat of the sun on his back.

Heat rises.

The fire gave out a fierce heat.

—see also white heat

2.

[ U , C , usually sing. ] the level of temperature :

to increase / reduce the heat

Test the heat of the water before getting in.

Set the oven to a low / high / moderate heat.

—see also blood heat

3.

[ U ] hot weather; the hot conditions in a building / vehicle, etc. :

You should not go out in the heat of the day (= at the hottest time) .

to suffer from the heat

the afternoon / midday heat

The heat in the factory was unbearable.

—see also prickly heat

FOR COOKING

4.

[ U ] a source of heat, especially one that you cook food on :

Return the pan to the heat and stir.

IN BUILDING / ROOM

5.

[ U ] ( especially NAmE ) = heating :

The heat wasn't on and the house was freezing.

STRONG FEELINGS

6.

[ U ] strong feelings, especially of anger or excitement :

'No, I won't,' he said with heat in his voice.

The chairman tried to take the heat out of the situation (= to make people calmer) .

In the heat of the moment she forgot what she wanted to say (= because she was so angry or excited) .

In the heat of the argument he said a lot of things he regretted later.

PRESSURE

7.

[ U ] pressure on sb to do or achieve sth :

The heat is on now that the election is only a week away.

United turned up the heat on their opponents with a second goal.

Can she take the heat of this level of competition?

RACE

8.

[ C ] one of a series of races or competitions, the winners of which then compete against each other in the next part of the competition :

a qualifying heat

She won her heat.

He did well in the heats ; hopefully he'll do as well in the final.

—see also dead heat

IDIOMS

- be on heat

- if you can't stand the heat (get out of the kitchen)

■ verb

to make sth hot or warm; to become hot or warm :

[ vn ]

Heat the oil and add the onions.

The system produced enough energy to heat several thousand homes.

[also v ]

PHRASAL VERBS

- heat up

- heat sth up

••

WORD ORIGIN

Old English hǣtu (noun), hǣtan (verb), of Germanic origin; related to Dutch hitte (noun) and German heizen (verb), also to hot .

Oxford Advanced Learner's English Dictionary.      Оксфордский английский словарь для изучающик язык на продвинутом уровне.