Meaning of FINISH in English

FINISH

I. fin ‧ ish 1 S1 W2 /ˈfɪnɪʃ/ BrE AmE verb

[ Word Family: verb : ↑ finish ; noun : ↑ finish ; adjective : ↑ finished ≠ ↑ unfinished ]

[ Date: 1300-1400 ; Language: French ; Origin: finir , from Latin finire , from finis 'end' ]

1 . STOP DOING SOMETHING ( also finish off ) [intransitive and transitive] to complete the last part of something that you are doing:

You can’t go anywhere until you’ve finished your homework.

Have you finished that book yet?

finish doing something

I finished typing the report just minutes before it was due.

‘How’s the decorating going?’ ‘We’ve nearly finished.’

2 . END [intransitive] especially British English when an event, activity, or period of time finishes, it ends, especially at a particular time:

The football season finishes in May.

What time does school finish?

3 . EAT/DRINK ( also finish up/off ) [transitive] to eat or drink all the rest of something, so there is none left:

I’ll just finish my coffee.

4 . END SOMETHING BY DOING SOMETHING ( also finish off ) [intransitive and transitive] to complete an event, performance, piece of work etc by doing one final thing

finish with

The party finished with a sing-song.

finish (something) by doing something

I would like to finish by thanking you all for your help.

5 . RACE [intransitive and transitive] to be in a particular position at the end of a race, competition etc

finish first/second/third etc

He finished second in the 100 metres, behind Ben Johnson.

6 . TAKE AWAY SB’S STRENGTH ( also finish off ) [transitive] to take away all of someone’s strength, energy etc SYN do somebody in :

Another run like that would just about finish me.

7 . USE ALL OF SOMETHING [intransitive and transitive] British English to completely use up the supply of something, especially food:

The ice cream’s finished – can you get some more?

8 . put/add the finishing touches (to something) to add the final details that make your work complete:

The band are putting the finishing touches to their new album.

9 . SURFACE [transitive] to give the surface of something, especially wood, a smooth appearance by painting, polishing, or covering it:

The furniture had been attractively finished in a walnut veneer.

• • •

THESAURUS

▪ finish to complete the last part of something that you are doing:

Have you finished your homework?

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The builders say they should have finished by Friday.

▪ complete to finish making or doing something that has taken a long time to finish:

The new bridge will be completed in two years’ time.

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She has just completed her PhD.

▪ finalize to do the last things that are necessary in order to settle a plan or agreement in a satisfactory way:

A spokesman said that they were hoping to finalize an agreement in the near future.

▪ conclude formal to officially finish something:

The police have now concluded their investigations.

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Ralph Ellis, Managing Director, concluded the conference with a review of the trading year.

▪ wrap something up informal to finish something successfully – used especially about agreements or sports competitions:

Negotiators are meeting on Friday to wrap up the deal.

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Liverpool had several chances to wrap up the game.

▪ round something off British English , round something out American English to do something as a way of ending a day, an evening, an event etc in an enjoyable or suitable way:

They rounded off the day with a barbecue at the beach.

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A concert in the park is being organized to round off the programme of events.

▪ get it over with/get it over and done with to do something that you have to do now, so that it is finished and you can stop worrying about it:

Let’s go and do the shopping now and get it over with.

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Just tell him how you feel and get it over and done with.

▪ be done/be through informal if you are done, you have finished – used especially when other people are waiting for you:

We’re nearly done.

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We should be through in half an hour.

▪ be through with something/be done with something informal to have finished using something – used especially when other people are waiting to use it:

I’m done with the file.

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I’ll let you know when I’m through with it.

▪ tie up the loose ends to finish dealing with the final details of something, so that is all finished:

‘Is the talk ready?’ ‘I just need to tie up a few loose ends.’

finish off phrasal verb

1 . finish something ↔ off to complete the last part of something that you are doing:

It’ll take me a couple of hours to finish this job off.

2 . finish something ↔ off to use or eat all of something, so there is none left:

Who finished off the cake?

3 . to complete an event, performance, piece of work etc by doing one final thing

finish off with

We’ll finish off with a track from Adam’s new album.

finish something ↔ off

She finished off her speech by thanking her sponsors.

finish off/finish something ↔ off by doing something

Finish off by cleaning the monitor and the keyboard.

4 . finish somebody/something ↔ off to kill a person or animal when they are already weak or wounded

5 . finish somebody ↔ off to take away all of someone’s strength, energy etc:

The walk up the hill really finished me off.

finish up phrasal verb

1 . British English informal to arrive at a particular place, after going to other places first SYN end up :

I took a long holiday in Italy and finished up in Rome.

2 . British English informal to get into a particular state or situation as the result of what you have done, especially without planning or expecting it SYN end up :

He tried to bribe a police officer and finished up in jail.

finish up with

Brett got into a fight and finished up with a broken wrist.

3 . finish something ↔ up to eat or drink all the rest of something, so there is none left:

Come on, finish up your drinks!

finish with something/somebody phrasal verb

1 . have/be finished with something to no longer need to use something:

Have you finished with the scissors?

2 . have/be finished with somebody to have finished talking to someone or dealing with them, especially when you are angry with them or want to punish them:

Don’t go. I haven’t finished with you yet.

‘When I’m finished with you,’ he said, ‘you’ll be lucky if you’re still alive.’

3 . to end a romantic or sexual relationship with someone:

So I told him I wanted to finish with him.

II. finish 2 S3 BrE AmE noun

[ Word Family: verb : ↑ finish ; noun : ↑ finish ; adjective : ↑ finished ≠ ↑ unfinished ]

1 . [countable] the end or last part of something:

I was watching the race but I didn’t get to see the finish.

The day was a disaster from start to finish (=from the beginning until the end) .

I won’t walk out – I like to see things through to the finish.

a close finish (=an end of a race where two competitors are very close to each other)

2 . a fight to the finish a fight or game in which the teams or competitors struggle until one is completely defeated

3 . [uncountable and countable] the appearance of the surface of an object after it has been painted, polished etc:

That table has a beautiful finish.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English.      Longman - Словарь современного английского языка.