Meaning of LOOSE in English

LOOSE

/ luːs; NAmE / adjective , verb , noun

■ adjective

( loos·er , loos·est )

NOT FIXED / TIED

1.

not firmly fixed where it should be; able to become separated from sth :

a loose button / tooth

Check that the plug has not come loose .

2.

not tied together; not held in position by anything or contained in anything :

She usually wears her hair loose.

The potatoes were sold loose, not in bags.

3.

[ not usually before noun ] free to move around without control; not tied up or shut in somewhere :

The sheep had got out and were loose on the road.

The horse had broken loose (= escaped) from its tether.

During the night, somebody had cut the boat loose from its moorings.

CLOTHES

4.

not fitting closely :

a loose shirt

OPP tight

NOT SOLID / HARD

5.

not tightly packed together; not solid or hard :

loose soil

a fabric with a loose weave

NOT STRICT / EXACT

6.

not strictly organized or controlled :

a loose alliance / coalition / federation

7.

not exact; not very careful :

a loose translation

loose thinking

IMMORAL

8.

[ usually before noun ] ( old-fashioned ) having or involving an attitude to sexual relationships that people consider to be immoral :

a young man of loose morals

BALL

9.

( sport ) not in any player's control :

He pounced on a loose ball .

BODY WASTE

10.

having too much liquid in it :

a baby with loose bowel movements

►  loose·ness noun [ U ]

IDIOMS

- break / cut / tear (sb/sth) loose from sb/sth

- hang / stay loose

- have a loose tongue

- let loose

- let loose sth

- let sb/sth loose

—more at fast adverb , hell , screw noun

■ verb

[ vn ] ( formal )

RELEASE

1.

~ sth (on / upon sb/sth) to release sth or let it happen or be expressed in an uncontrolled way :

His speech loosed a tide of nationalist sentiment.

MAKE STH LOOSE

2.

to make sth loose, especially sth that is tied or held tightly

SYN loosen :

He loosed the straps that bound her arms.

FIRE BULLETS

3.

~ sth (off) (at sb/sth) to fire bullets, arrows, etc.

HELP NOTE : Do not confuse this verb with to lose = 'to be unable to find sth'.

■ noun

IDIOMS

- on the loose

••

WORD ORIGIN

Middle English loos free from bonds , from Old Norse lauss , of Germanic origin; related to Dutch and German los .

Oxford Advanced Learner's English Dictionary.      Оксфордский английский словарь для изучающик язык на продвинутом уровне.