Meaning of SLACK in English

SLACK

/ slæk; NAmE / adjective , noun , verb

■ adjective ( slack·er , slack·est )

1.

not stretched tight

SYN loose :

She was staring into space, her mouth slack.

The rope suddenly went slack.

slack muscles

2.

( of business ) not having many customers or sales; not busy :

a slack period

3.

( disapproving ) not putting enough care, attention or energy into sth and so not doing it well enough :

He's been very slack in his work lately.

Discipline in the classroom is very slack.

►  slack·ly adverb :

Her arms hung slackly by her sides.

►  slack·ness noun [ U ]

■ noun [ U ]

—see also slacks

1.

the part of a rope, etc. that is hanging loosely :

There's too much slack in the tow rope.

2.

people, money or space that should be used more fully in an organization :

There's very little slack in the budget.

3.

very small pieces of coal

IDIOMS

- cut sb some slack

- take up the slack

■ verb

[ v ] to work less hard than you usually do or should do

PHRASAL VERBS

- slack off (on sth)

••

WORD ORIGIN

adjective and noun senses 1 to 2 verb Old English slæc inclined to be lazy, unhurried , of Germanic origin; related to Latin laxus loose.

noun sense 3 late Middle English : probably from Low German or Dutch .

Oxford Advanced Learner's English Dictionary.      Оксфордский английский словарь для изучающик язык на продвинутом уровне.