Meaning of TRIAL in English

TRIAL

/ ˈtraɪəl; NAmE / noun , verb

■ noun

LAW

1.

[ U , C ] a formal examination of evidence in court by a judge and often a jury , to decide if sb accused of a crime is guilty or not :

a murder trial

He's on trial for murder.

She will stand trial / go on trial for fraud.

The men were arrested but not brought to trial .

The case never came to trial .

She is awaiting trial on corruption charges.

He did not receive a fair trial.

She was detained without trial.

TEST

2.

[ C , U ] the process of testing the ability, quality or performance of sb/sth, especially before you make a final decision about them :

The new drug is undergoing clinical trials.

She agreed to employ me for a trial period .

The system was introduced on a trial basis for one month.

a trial separation (= of a couple whose marriage is in difficulties)

We had the machine on trial for a week.

a trial of strength (= a contest to see who is stronger)

IN SPORT

3.

[ C , usually pl. ] ( BrE ) ( NAmE try·out ) a competition or series of tests to find the best players for a sports team or an important event :

Olympic trials

FOR ANIMALS

4.

[ C , usually pl. ] an event at which animals compete or perform :

horse trials

DIFFICULT EXPERIENCE

5.

[ C ] trial (to sb) an experience or a person that causes difficulties for sb :

the trials and tribulations of married life

She was a sore trial to her family at times.

IDIOMS

- trial and error

■ verb

( -ll- ) [ vn , v ] ( BrE ) to test the ability, quality or performance of sth to see if it will be effective or successful

••

WORD ORIGIN

late Middle English (as a noun): from Anglo-Norman French , or from medieval Latin triallum . The verb dates from the 1980s.

Oxford Advanced Learner's English Dictionary.      Оксфордский английский словарь для изучающик язык на продвинутом уровне.