Meaning of COUNTER in English

COUNTER

1. n.1 a a long flat-topped fitment in a shop, bank, etc., across which business is conducted with customers. b a similar structure used for serving food etc. in a cafeteria or bar.

2 a a small disc used for keeping the score etc. esp. in table-games. b a token representing a coin. c something used in bargaining; a pawn (a counter in the struggle for power).

3 an apparatus used for counting.

4 Physics an apparatus used for counting individual ionizing particles etc.

5 a person or thing that counts.

Phrases and idioms:

over the counter by ordinary retail purchase. under the counter (esp. of the sale of scarce goods) surreptitiously, esp. illegally.

Etymology: AF count(e)our, OF conteo(i)r, f. med.L computatorium (as COMPUTE) 2. v., adv., adj., & n.

--v.

1. tr. a oppose, contradict (countered our proposal with their own). b meet by a countermove.

2 intr. a make a countermove. b make an opposing statement ('I shall!' he countered).

3 intr. Boxing give a return blow while parrying.

--adv.

1. in the opposite direction (ran counter to the fox).

2 contrary (his action was counter to my wishes).

--adj.

1. opposed; opposite.

2 duplicate; serving as a check.

--n.

1. a parry; a countermove.

2 something opposite or opposed.

Phrases and idioms:

act (or go) counter to disobey (instructions etc.). go (or hunt or run) counter run or ride against the direction taken by a quarry. run counter to act contrary to.

Etymology: ME f. OF countre f. L contra against: see COUNTER- 3. n.1 the part of a horse's breast between the shoulders and under the neck.

2 the curved part of the stern of a ship.

3 Printing a part of a printing-type etc. that is completely enclosed by an outline (e.g. the loop of P).

Etymology: 17th c.: orig. unkn. 4. n. the back part of a shoe or a boot round the heel.

Etymology: abbr. of counterfort buttress

Oxford English vocab.      Оксфордский английский словарь.