Meaning of PUT in English

PUT

INDEX:

1. to put something somewhere

2. to put something in the place where it was before

3. to put something somewhere quickly or carelessly

4. to put several things on top of each other

5. to put something into a hole or small space

6. to put something in a liquid for a short time

7. to put paint, glue, make-up etc onto a surface

8. to put something in a sloping position

9. to put something somewhere while it is not being used

10. to put things into a bag, box, car etc before taking them somewhere

11. to put equipment in a place and make it ready to be used

12. to put someone in a place

13. to put money in a bank

RELATED WORDS

to fasten one thing to another : ↑ ATTACH

put on clothes : ↑ CLOTHES

put seeds or plants in the ground : ↑ GROW

to put liquid, powder etc somewhere by pouring it out of a container : ↑ POUR

to put information into a computer : ↑ COMPUTERS/INTERNET/EMAIL

to put something where people won’t find it : ↑ HIDE

see also

↑ LIFT

↑ MOVE/NOT MOVE

↑ SPREAD

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1. to put something somewhere

▷ put /pʊt/ [transitive verb]

to move something to a place or position and leave it there :

put something in/on/there etc

▪ Just put the bags on the table.

▪ I can’t remember where I put my keys.

put something back

put it in the place where it was before or where it should be

▪ I put the letter back in the envelope.

put something away

put it where it is usually kept

▪ It’s time to put everything away now.

put something down/put down something

put something you are holding onto a surface

▪ She picked up a porcelain figurine and put it down again.

put something up/put up something

fasten something to a wall, ceiling, or in a high position

▪ I’m not allowed to put up any posters in my bedroom.

▷ place /pleɪs/ [transitive verb]

to carefully put something somewhere :

place something on/in/over/there etc

▪ Every week someone comes and places fresh flowers on her grave.

▪ Place some lemon slices on the fish before serving it.

▪ Food is placed in a large cage, and when the animal enters, the door drops down.

▪ Winters placed his hand on my arm, holding me back.

▷ leave /liːv/ [transitive verb]

to put something in a place and not take it with you when you go :

▪ Now, where did I leave my gym shoes?

leave something in/on/on top of etc

▪ Just leave your umbrellas and things behind the door.

▪ She had left all her personal belongings in the London apartment.

leave something somewhere

▪ I’m sure I left my bag somewhere around here.

▷ abandon /əˈbændən/ [transitive verb]

to put someone or something somewhere and never go back to get them, for example because you want to get rid of them or because you are unable to take them with you :

▪ Retreating troops were told to abandon their weapons and run as fast as they could towards the beach.

▪ A new-born baby was found abandoned on the steps of a hospital yesterday.

▷ position /pəˈzɪʃ ə n/ [transitive verb]

to carefully move something into the right position for a particular purpose :

▪ Make sure you position the wheel correctly before you tighten up the nuts.

▪ Federal troops were positioned around the city.

▷ plant a bomb/explosives etc /ˌplɑːnt ə ˈbɒmǁˌplænt ə ˈbɑːm/ [verb phrase]

to put a bomb in a public place :

plant something in/at/outside/nearby etc

▪ The two men planted the bomb outside Harrods department store in London.

plant something in/on/there etc

▪ No rebel group has claimed responsibility for planting the explosives in the van.

▷ plant /plɑːntǁplænt/ [transitive verb]

to put something in someone’s pocket, room, car etc in order to make them seem guilty of a crime :

▪ It turned out the security services had planted the documents in his luggage.

▪ He accused the police of planting evidence.

▷ lay /leɪ/ [transitive verb]

to put something on a surface, especially so that it is flat :

lay something on/across something

▪ She unfolded the map and laid it on the table.

lay something out/lay out something

arrange something carefully on a surface

▪ Before you start packing, lay out all the clothes on the bed.

lay something down/lay down something

put something you are holding onto a surface

▪ Farley laid the gun down and surrendered.

▷ set down /ˌset ˈdaʊn/ [transitive phrasal verb]

to put down something big and heavy which you have been carrying - used especially in literature or stories :

set something/it/them down

▪ They set the coffin down in front of the altar.

set down something

▪ The movers brought in the dresser, which they set down against the wall.

▷ deposit /dɪˈpɒzɪt, dɪˈpɒzətǁdɪˈpɑː-/ [transitive verb]

to put something down - used especially when describing events in a formal or humorous way :

▪ Aunt Augusta deposited the contents of her bag on the kitchen table.

▪ After the lessons on the environment, children deposited much more litter in trash cans, rather than dropping it.

2. to put something in the place where it was before

▷ put back /ˌpʊt ˈbæk/ [transitive phrasal verb]

to put something back in the place it is usually kept or in the place it was in before :

put something back

▪ Put the cups back in the cupboard when you’ve finished with them.

▪ She took a quick look at the contents of the book, and then put it back on the shelf.

put back something

▪ He had tidied up the room and put back all my things where they belonged.

▷ return /rɪˈtɜːʳn/ [transitive verb] written

to put something back in the place it was before :

▪ Johnson carefully returned the document to its hiding place.

▪ Return the pan to the heat and simmer for a further 5-10 minutes.

3. to put something somewhere quickly or carelessly

▷ shove /ʃʌv/ [transitive verb] informal

to push something quickly or carelessly into a space or container :

shove something in/into/under etc

▪ Shove anything you don’t want in that sack.

▪ He bundled the papers together and shoved them into a drawer.

▷ stick /stɪk/ [transitive verb] spoken

to put something somewhere, especially quickly or carelessly :

stick something on/in/over something

▪ I stuck the pictures in a drawer and forgot all about them.

▪ ‘What should I do with these?’ ‘Oh, just stick them anywhere.’

▷ dump /dʌmp/ [transitive verb]

to carelessly drop something somewhere in an untidy way, especially something heavy :

▪ People dump rubbish in the lanes, and the council is slow to clean it up.

dump something on/in/there etc

▪ Who dumped all these books on my desk?

dump something down

▪ I dumped my heavy suitcase down on the doorstep.

▷ slam down /ˌslæm ˈdaʊn/ [transitive phrasal verb]

to put something down somewhere quickly and violently because you are angry :

slam something down

▪ She slammed the cup down, and coffee splashed all over him.

slam down something

▪ ‘To hell with you,’ he shouted, and slammed down the phone.

▷ thrust /θrʌst/ [transitive verb]

to put something forcefully and suddenly into a place :

thrust something in/on/under etc

▪ Clark thrust a paper sack across the counter and demanded money.

▪ She thrust the bag into my hands. ‘Hide it,’ she hissed.

▪ He nervously thrust his hands into his pockets.

▷ pop /pɒpǁpɑːp/ [transitive verb] informal

to put something somewhere quickly for a short time :

pop something in/into/under etc

▪ She took out a piece of chewing gum and popped it in her mouth.

▪ Pop it in the microwave for a couple of minutes.

▷ bung /bʌŋ/ [transitive verb] British informal

to put something somewhere quickly and without thinking carefully :

bung something in/into/on etc

▪ Could you bung those clothes into the washing machine for me?

▪ Just sign the card, bung it in an envelope and send it off.

▷ plonk especially British /plunk American /plɒŋkǁplɑːŋk, plʌŋk/ [transitive verb]

to put something down somewhere noisily and carelessly :

plonk something on/in/there etc

▪ She brought a bottle of beer and a glass and plonked them on the table in front of me.

▪ Gamblers plunked nickels and quarters into the slot machines.

plonk something down

▪ Are those things for me? Just plonk them down anywhere.

▪ Gary plunked a dollar down on the counter to pay for his Coke.

4. to put several things on top of each other

▷ pile /paɪl/ [transitive verb]

to put a lot of things on top of each other, especially in an untidy way :

pile something on/onto/there etc

▪ Gifts were piled under the Christmas tree.

▪ Has anyone else noticed that towels dry faster when you don’t pile them in the middle of the floor?

pile something up

put a lot of things on top of each other in a tall pile

▪ He piled his dirty laundry up just outside my door.

be piling up

use this to say a pile is growing quickly

▪ We called the police when we noticed her newspapers and mail were piling up.

▷ stack /stæk/ [transitive verb]

to put things neatly on top of each other :

▪ I’ll start stacking the chairs.

stack something against/in/on something

▪ Boxes were stacked in the corner.

stack something up

put a lot of things on top of each other in a tall pile

▪ My kids leave dirty plates stacked up in the sink until I get home.

▷ heap /hiːp/ [transitive verb]

to put a lot of things on top of each other in an untidy way :

heap something on/onto

▪ Cheap clothes and shoes were heaped on tables.

heap something with something

▪ a plate heaped with salad

heap something in/into a pile

▪ Eileen collected the leaves, heaping them into piles for burning.

lie heaped

▪ Her clothes lay heaped together in a corner of the room.

5. to put something into a hole or small space

▷ put /pʊt/ [transitive verb]

put something in/into/inside etc

▪ I put the coin in my pocket.

▪ When did you last put oil in the car?

▪ She put the sales slip in the plastic bag with the dress.

▷ slide /slaɪd/ [transitive verb]

to move something smoothly into a small narrow space :

slide something into

▪ Slide your card into the machine and then tap in your number.

▪ The coffin was slid into the waiting hearse.

▷ tuck /tʌk/ [transitive verb]

to put something in a small space so that it is covered and is safe, comfortable, or warm :

tuck something into/under/in etc

▪ It was starting to get cold, and she tucked her hands into the pockets of her jeans.

▪ He tucked the newspaper under his arm and walked on.

be tucked in/under etc

▪ The boys were tucked in bed, fast asleep.

▷ insert /ɪnˈsɜːʳt/ [transitive verb]

to carefully put something into a hole or space, especially one where it is designed to go, for example in a machine or piece of equipment :

▪ Insert the correct coins, then select the drink you want and press the button.

insert something in/into/between etc

▪ A nurse carefully inserted the needle into my left arm.

▪ A very thin sheet of paper is then inserted between the metal plates.

insertion /ɪnˈsɜːʳʃ ə n/ [uncountable noun]

▪ After insertion being inserted the pipe is filled with gas.

6. to put something in a liquid for a short time

▷ dip /dɪp/ [transitive verb]

to put something into a liquid for a short time and take it out again :

dip something in/into something

▪ Emily dipped her toes in the water and squealed.

▪ Dip stale bread in egg and milk and fry it in butter to make French Toast.

▷ dunk /dʌŋk/ [transitive verb]

to dip something such as a piece of bread or cake into a hot drink or soup before eating it :

dunk something in/into something

▪ Bill dunked a piece of bread in the soup.

▪ My daughter likes to dunk her biscuits in my tea.

7. to put paint, glue, make-up etc onto a surface

▷ put on /ˌpʊt ˈɒn/ [transitive phrasal verb]

to put something such a paint or glue onto a surface, or make-up powders and colours that women put on their faces onto your face :

put something on

▪ The paint had been put on too thickly, and it had dripped.

put on something

▪ When you put the glue on, be careful not to get any on your fingers.

▪ Patricia went upstairs to put on some lipstick.

▷ apply /əˈplaɪ/ [transitive verb]

to put something such as paint or glue onto a surface, or make-up powders and colours that women put on their faces onto your face - used especially in written instructions on how to use it :

▪ Apply the cream in the morning and the evening.

▪ Make sure the surface is completely dry before applying the final coat of paint.

▷ slap on /ˌslæp ˈɒn/ [transitive phrasal verb] informal

to put something such as paint or glue onto a surface, or make-up powders and colours that women put on their faces onto your face quickly and without much care, and usually in large amounts :

slap something on

▪ Mike was slapping jam on a slice of bread.

slap on something

▪ Slap on a coat of paint and it will look good as new.

8. to put something in a sloping position

▷ lean /liːn/ [transitive verb]

to put something in a sloping position so that it is against a wall or other surface and is supported by it :

▪ She leaned the ladder against the house and climbed up to the window.

lean something (up) against something

▪ Soldiers leaned their M-16 rifles up against their tables as they ate.

▷ rest /rest/ [transitive verb]

to put something against a surface so that it is supported by it :

rest something on/against something

▪ She slid down in her chair and rested her head on the back of the seat.

▪ Resting his spade against the wall, he went to help Michael light the fire.

▷ stand /stænd/ [transitive verb]

to lean something in an almost upright position against something such as a wall :

stand something against/in etc

▪ Maggie stood her bicycle against the wall of the shed.

▪ Just stand it in the corner, so it doesn’t fall.

▷ prop /prɒpǁprɑːp/ [transitive verb]

to lean something against a wall or other surface, especially quickly and for a short time :

prop something against something

▪ He propped his bicycle against the fence and ran inside.

stand/lie propped against something

▪ An old guitar lay propped against a wall.

9. to put something somewhere while it is not being used

▷ store /stɔːʳ/ [transitive verb]

to put something somewhere and keep it there until it is needed :

store something in/under etc

▪ Store the vegetables in a cool dark place.

▪ The computer stores the information in its memory automatically.

store something away

store something where it cannot be seen

▪ Instead of being distributed, the food was unloaded and stored away in a warehouse.

▷ stash /stæʃ/ [intransitive/transitive verb]

to put something such as money, valuable things, or drugs in a secret place, especially when you have them illegally :

▪ The two men were looking for a place to stash their weapons.

stash away something/stash something away

▪ He has illegally stashed away as much as $50 in foreign bank accounts.

stash something in something

▪ The stolen goods had been stashed in a storage unit in Burbank.

have something stashed away

▪ He must have all that money stashed away somewhere.

▷ stow /stəʊ/ [transitive verb]

to put something such as equipment or a bag neatly in a space until you need it again :

stow something in/on/under etc

▪ She stowed her luggage on the rack above her head and then sat down.

stow something away

stow it where it cannot be seen

▪ In the daytime the mattress is stowed away in that cupboard.

10. to put things into a bag, box, car etc before taking them somewhere

▷ pack /pæk/ [intransitive/transitive verb]

to put things into cases, bags, boxes etc so that you can take them somewhere :

▪ We’re going to Greece tomorrow, and I haven’t started packing yet!

▪ Did you remember to pack the suntan lotion?

pack a bag/suitcase

put things into a bag etc

▪ She packed her suitcase and set off for the airport.

pack something into something

▪ We packed all our books into boxes.

▷ get packed /ˌget ˈpækt/ [verb phrase] spoken

to put all the clothes and other things you need for travelling into bags :

▪ How long do you think it’ll take you to get packed?

▪ By the time we’d gotten packed it was almost midnight.

▷ load /ləʊd/ [transitive verb]

to put goods, furniture, or other large objects into a large vehicle so that they can be taken somewhere :

load something into/onto something

▪ I started loading the boxes into the truck.

be loaded with something

▪ Trucks loaded with food and medicine waited at the border.

fully loaded

▪ When the planes are fully loaded, they aren’t able to take off from this runway, as it is too short.

▷ load up /ˌləʊd ˈʌp/ [intransitive/transitive phrasal verb]

to put a lot of things into a vehicle or boat, especially so that it is full :

load up a truck/car etc

▪ Do you have time to help us load up the car?

load up with

▪ The ship’s lifeboat was taken into Lerwick to load up with fresh vegetables.

11. to put equipment in a place and make it ready to be used

▷ put in /ˌpʊt ˈɪn/ [transitive phrasal verb]

to put a new piece of machinery or equipment into a room or building :

put in something

▪ The landlord has promised to put in a new heating system.

put something in

▪ The workmen are coming to put the new windows in today.

▷ install /ɪnˈstɔːl/ [transitive verb]

to put a new piece of machinery or equipment into a room or building, and connect it to the electricity supply, water supply etc :

▪ Crime has dropped since the video cameras were installed in the town centre.

▪ The company is installing a new computer system.

▷ fit /fɪt/ [transitive verb]

to put a new part or piece of equipment into or onto something such as a machine or car :

▪ I had to fit new locks after the burglary.

12. to put someone in a place

▷ put /pʊt/ [transitive verb]

put somebody in/on/at etc

▪ They put me in a room on my own and locked the door.

▪ The photographer arranged the wedding guests, putting the smallest ones at the front.

▪ Grandmother was getting too frail to live on her own, so we had to put her in an old people’s home.

▷ post /pəʊst/ [transitive verb]

to put a soldier or police officer in a position where they will be able to guard a place or watch whoever is coming in or going out :

▪ They have posted guards at every door to make sure no one enters the building.

▪ Sentries are being posted outside all government buildings.

▷ position /pəˈzɪʃ ə n/ [transitive verb]

to put a group of soldiers or police officers in a particular place, especially so that they are ready to guard it :

▪ The French generals had positioned thousands of troops along the border.

▪ Army units are to be positioned at all major installations including factories and power stations.

13. to put money in a bank

▷ put in /ˌpʊt ˈɪn/ [transitive phrasal verb]

▪ How much did you put in?

put something in the bank/an account

▪ I put $50 in my bank every week.

▪ Any money that you put in your account will immediately start earning interest.

put money/a cheque/£100/$200 etc in

▪ When did you put the money in?

▷ deposit /dɪˈpɒzɪt, dɪˈpɒzətǁdɪˈpɑː-/ [transitive verb]

to put money into a bank account - used especially by people who work in banks :

▪ The money is deposited in my account every month.

▪ Our records show that you deposited $200 in your account on January 17th.

Longman Activator English vocab.      Английский словарь Longman активатор .