Meaning of SINK in English

SINK

n.

Pronunciation: ' si ŋ k

Function: verb

Inflected Form: sank \ ' sa ŋ k \ or sunk \ ' s ə ŋ k \ ; sunk ; sink · ing

Etymology: Middle English, from Old English sincan; akin to Old High German sinkan to sink

Date: before 12th century

intransitive verb

1 a : to go to the bottom : SUBMERGE b : to become partly buried (as in mud) c : to become engulfed

2 a (1) : to fall or drop to a lower place or level (2) : to flow at a lower depth or level (3) : to burn with lower intensity (4) : to fall to a lower pitch or volume <his voice sank to a whisper> b : to subside gradually : SETTLE c : to disappear from view d : to slope gradually : DIP

3 a : to soak or become absorbed : PENETRATE b : to become impressively known or felt <the lesson had sunk in>

4 : to become deeply absorbed < sank into reverie>

5 a : to go downward in quality, state, or condition b : to grow less in amount or worth

6 a : to fall or drop slowly for lack of strength b : to become depressed c : to fail in health or strength broadly : FAIL

transitive verb

1 a : to cause to sink < sink a battleship> b : to force down especially below the earth's surface c : to cause (something) to penetrate

2 : IMMERSE , ABSORB <he sank himself into his studies>

3 a : to dig or bore (a well or shaft) in the earth : EXCAVATE b : to form by cutting or excising < sink words in stone>

4 : to cast down or bring to a low condition or state : OVERWHELM , DEFEAT

5 : to lower in standing or reputation : ABASE

6 a : to lessen in value or amount b : to lower or soften (the voice) in speaking

7 : RESTRAIN , SUPPRESS < sink s her pride and approaches the despised neighbor ― Richard Harrison>

8 : to pay off (as a debt) : LIQUIDATE

9 : INVEST 1

10 : DROP 7C < sink a putt> < sink a jump shot>

11 chiefly British : to drink down completely

– sink · able \ ' si ŋ -k ə -b ə l \ adjective

– sink one's teeth into

1 : to bite into

2 : to eagerly devote one's attention to <likes to sink her teeth into a good book>

Merriam Webster Collegiate English Dictionary.      Merriam Webster - Энциклопедический словарь английского языка.