Meaning of HOLE in English

HOLE

/ həʊl; NAmE hoʊl/ noun , verb

■ noun

HOLLOW SPACE

1.

[ C ] a hollow space in sth solid or in the surface of sth :

He dug a deep hole in the garden.

The bomb blew a huge hole in the ground.

Water had collected in the holes in the road.

OPENING

2.

[ C ] a space or opening that goes all the way through sth :

to drill / bore / punch / kick a hole in sth

There were holes in the knees of his trousers.

The children climbed through a hole in the fence.

a bullet hole

the hole in the ozone layer

—see also ozone hole

ANIMAL'S HOME

3.

[ C ] the home of a small animal :

a rabbit / mouse, etc. hole

—see also bolt-hole

—compare foxhole , pigeonhole

UNPLEASANT PLACE

4.

[ C , usually sing. ] ( informal , disapproving ) an unpleasant place to live or be in

SYN dump :

I am not going to bring up my child in this hole.

—see also hellhole

IN GOLF

5.

[ C ] a hollow in the ground that you must get the ball into; one of the sections of a golf course with the tee at the beginning and the hole at the end :

The ball rolled into the hole and she had won.

an eighteen-hole golf course

He liked to play a few holes after work.

She won the first hole.

—picture at golf

FAULT / WEAKNESS

6.

[ C , usually pl. ] a fault or weakness in sth such as a plan, law or story :

He was found not guilty because of holes in the prosecution case.

I don't believe what she says—her story is full of holes.

—see also loophole

EMPTY PLACE / POSITION

7.

[ sing. ] a place or position that needs to be filled because sb/sth is no longer there :

After his wife left, there was a gaping hole in his life.

Buying the new equipment left a big hole in the company's finances.

HELP NOTE : There are many other compounds ending in hole . You will find them at their place in the alphabet.

IDIOMS

- in a hole

- in the hole

- make a hole in sth

—more at ace noun , burn verb , dig verb , pick verb

■ verb

MAKE A HOLE

1.

[ vn ] [ usually passive ] to make a hole or holes in sth, especially a boat or ship

IN GOLF

2.

hole (out) to hit a golf ball into the hole :

[ vn ]

She holed a 25 foot putt.

[ v ]

She holed out from 25 feet.

PHRASAL VERBS

- hole up | be holed up

••

WORD ORIGIN

Old English hol (noun), holian (verb), of Germanic origin; related to Dutch hol (noun) cave, (adjective) hollow, and German hohl hollow, from an Indo-European root meaning cover, conceal.

Oxford Advanced Learner's English Dictionary.      Оксфордский английский словарь для изучающик язык на продвинутом уровне.